2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161701
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Measurement issues in elicitation of patient preferences for health outcomes
Abstract:
Measurement issues in elicitation of patient preferences for health outcomes
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2001
Author:Casper, Gail, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Regenstrief Institute for Health Care
Title:Research Fellow
Contact Address:1050 Wishard Boulevard, Indianapolis, IN, 46202, USA
Contact Telephone:317.630.2641
Increasingly, patient preferences are incorporated in health care decisions having an impact on quality-of-life. This is especially true when efficacy of competing treatments are. Health care providers' reservations persist related to feasibility, reliability, and validity of preferences elicited regarding decisions. This study elicited preferences for health outcomes from 52 subjects prior to initiation of, and during chemotherapy. A single Visual Analog Scale (VAS) and a script to standardize the preference rating experience across subjects were used. Subjects were able to identify their health outcome preferences. Theoretical range of the VAS is 0 to 1.0; results approached a normal distribution. Concurrent ratings of two standard health states, death and perfect health, supported reliability. Mean VAS for death clustered at the low extreme of the scale, while mean VAS for perfect health clustered at the high extreme. Test-retest reliability was high for all three VAS measures. At Time 2, preferences were elicited using two methods: blinded and revealed Time 1 ratings. The difference between these methods was not significant; thus bias due to anchoring/ adjusting was absent. Preference assessment in acutely ill patients is feasible and acceptable; measures exhibit reliability and validity. Use of the VAS enables practitioners to elicit preferences effectively.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMeasurement issues in elicitation of patient preferences for health outcomesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161701-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Measurement issues in elicitation of patient preferences for health outcomes</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Casper, Gail, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Regenstrief Institute for Health Care</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Research Fellow</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">1050 Wishard Boulevard, Indianapolis, IN, 46202, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">317.630.2641</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">casper_g@regenstrief.iupui.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Increasingly, patient preferences are incorporated in health care decisions having an impact on quality-of-life. This is especially true when efficacy of competing treatments are. Health care providers' reservations persist related to feasibility, reliability, and validity of preferences elicited regarding decisions. This study elicited preferences for health outcomes from 52 subjects prior to initiation of, and during chemotherapy. A single Visual Analog Scale (VAS) and a script to standardize the preference rating experience across subjects were used. Subjects were able to identify their health outcome preferences. Theoretical range of the VAS is 0 to 1.0; results approached a normal distribution. Concurrent ratings of two standard health states, death and perfect health, supported reliability. Mean VAS for death clustered at the low extreme of the scale, while mean VAS for perfect health clustered at the high extreme. Test-retest reliability was high for all three VAS measures. At Time 2, preferences were elicited using two methods: blinded and revealed Time 1 ratings. The difference between these methods was not significant; thus bias due to anchoring/ adjusting was absent. Preference assessment in acutely ill patients is feasible and acceptable; measures exhibit reliability and validity. Use of the VAS enables practitioners to elicit preferences effectively.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:25:48Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:25:48Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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