2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161702
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Nocturnal polyuria in type 2 diabetics
Abstract:
Nocturnal polyuria in type 2 diabetics
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2001
Author:Chasens, Eileen
P.I. Institution Name:Wayne State University
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 350 Cohn 5557 Cass Avenue, Detroit, MI, 48202, USA
Contact Telephone:313.577.1793
Purpose: Polyuria in persons with DM should abate after glucose control is established. However, nocturnal polyuria is also a symptom of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). This study examined glucose control, OSA, and nocturnal urine production. Conceptual Framework: Umlauf et al.’s (1999) Sleep Related Breathing Disorders—Nocturia Model describes the events in OSA where negative thoracic pressure causes a false signal of fluid overload. The release of atrial natriuretic peptide induces a diuresis. Methods: Subjects were adults (median age=64, range 51-91; 57% women; 67% Black) with nocturia ³ 2/night. Nondiabetic (n=20, HbA1c £ 6.2%) and type 2 DM subjects (n=10, HbA1c ³ 7.0%) were observed for intake/output, blood and urine sampling, and polysomnography. Results: No subject had a FBS above 170mg/dL and only one had a trace overnight glycosuria. Undetected OSA was found in 60% of type 2 DM subjects. Subjects with apnea/hypopnea index (AHI) ³ 15 had increased overnight urine production (p=.028) and type 2 DM subjects with AHI ³ 15 had the highest nocturnal urine production (p=.009) by minute volume change scores. Conclusions: The findings suggest that nocturia, OSA, and type 2 DM frequently coexists and may be interrelated.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNocturnal polyuria in type 2 diabeticsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161702-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Nocturnal polyuria in type 2 diabetics</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Chasens, Eileen</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Wayne State University</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 350 Cohn 5557 Cass Avenue, Detroit, MI, 48202, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">313.577.1793</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">e.chasens@wayne.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Polyuria in persons with DM should abate after glucose control is established. However, nocturnal polyuria is also a symptom of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). This study examined glucose control, OSA, and nocturnal urine production. Conceptual Framework: Umlauf et al.&rsquo;s (1999) Sleep Related Breathing Disorders&mdash;Nocturia Model describes the events in OSA where negative thoracic pressure causes a false signal of fluid overload. The release of atrial natriuretic peptide induces a diuresis. Methods: Subjects were adults (median age=64, range 51-91; 57% women; 67% Black) with nocturia &sup3; 2/night. Nondiabetic (n=20, HbA1c &pound; 6.2%) and type 2 DM subjects (n=10, HbA1c &sup3; 7.0%) were observed for intake/output, blood and urine sampling, and polysomnography. Results: No subject had a FBS above 170mg/dL and only one had a trace overnight glycosuria. Undetected OSA was found in 60% of type 2 DM subjects. Subjects with apnea/hypopnea index (AHI) &sup3; 15 had increased overnight urine production (p=.028) and type 2 DM subjects with AHI &sup3; 15 had the highest nocturnal urine production (p=.009) by minute volume change scores. Conclusions: The findings suggest that nocturia, OSA, and type 2 DM frequently coexists and may be interrelated.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:25:50Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:25:50Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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