2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161708
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Therapeutic touch: An evidence based nursing intervention – or is it?
Abstract:
Therapeutic touch: An evidence based nursing intervention – or is it?
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2001
Author:Deets, Carol
P.I. Institution Name:University of Cincinnati
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 405 Procter Hall, PO Box 2, Cincinnati, OH, 45221-0038, USA
Contact Telephone:513.558.0311
One of the most studied nursing interventions is therapeutic touch (TT) using Krieger's techniques. Since the landmark studies of Heidt and Quinn, the quality of TT intervention studies has continued to improve. But the question remains, is there sufficient research evidence to justify the use of TT in the practice setting? Three intervention review articles and 24 intervention articles (1989-00) were evaluated. Using these articles as data, the quality of the research design and the amount of support for an intervention for use in practice were evaluated. The quality of the research designs has improved dramatically with 18 of the 24 intervention studies highly rated. On the other hand, two of the 24 studies had significant evidence for the intervention with no design issues and five studies were significant but had design issues. In other words, 17 of the studies did not have evidence that supported employing the TT intervention in practice. Based on this study there is little research evidence to support the use of TT in the practice setting. Much needs to be accomplished before TT can be recommended for use in the clinical setting. The encouraging news is that the three 1999 intervention studies were quality studies.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTherapeutic touch: An evidence based nursing intervention – or is it?en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161708-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Therapeutic touch: An evidence based nursing intervention &ndash; or is it?</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Deets, Carol</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Cincinnati</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 405 Procter Hall, PO Box 2, Cincinnati, OH, 45221-0038, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">513.558.0311</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Carol.Deets@UC.EDU</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">One of the most studied nursing interventions is therapeutic touch (TT) using Krieger's techniques. Since the landmark studies of Heidt and Quinn, the quality of TT intervention studies has continued to improve. But the question remains, is there sufficient research evidence to justify the use of TT in the practice setting? Three intervention review articles and 24 intervention articles (1989-00) were evaluated. Using these articles as data, the quality of the research design and the amount of support for an intervention for use in practice were evaluated. The quality of the research designs has improved dramatically with 18 of the 24 intervention studies highly rated. On the other hand, two of the 24 studies had significant evidence for the intervention with no design issues and five studies were significant but had design issues. In other words, 17 of the studies did not have evidence that supported employing the TT intervention in practice. Based on this study there is little research evidence to support the use of TT in the practice setting. Much needs to be accomplished before TT can be recommended for use in the clinical setting. The encouraging news is that the three 1999 intervention studies were quality studies.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:25:56Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:25:56Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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