2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161710
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Quality of life of severely injured trauma survivors
Abstract:
Quality of life of severely injured trauma survivors
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2001
Author:DePalma, Judith, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Oncology Nursing Society
Title:Senior Research Associate
Contact Address:501 Holiday Drive, Pittsburgh, PA, 15220, USA
Contact Telephone:412.921.7373, ext. 4
Modern health care has made it possible for many severely injured trauma patients to survive. This study was designed to assess the quality of life (QOL) of severely injured trauma survivors; determine areas of patients' lives most impacted, and community resources that were needed. A convenience sample of 64 adult patients discharged from a Level I trauma center were selected based upon a combination of the Severity of Injury Score (> 25) and the Trauma Injury Score (< .90). Telephone interviews were done in this descriptive study to administer the Sickness Impact Profile (SIP), QOL analogue scale, community resource measure and demographic data form. All patients were interviewed 6 to 12 months post-discharge. Most of SIP's behavior categories indicated severe disruption of QOL, especially when compared with other trauma studies. The behavior categories most negatively impacted were work., recreation & pastimes, home management and sleep and rest. In some instances the most profound impact was on family members, with changes in lifestyle and roles. Community and medical resources were needed for longer periods of time than provided by third party payers. There are implications for trauma and rehabilitation centers, as well as community organizations and third party payers.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleQuality of life of severely injured trauma survivorsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161710-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Quality of life of severely injured trauma survivors</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">DePalma, Judith, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Oncology Nursing Society</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Senior Research Associate</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">501 Holiday Drive, Pittsburgh, PA, 15220, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">412.921.7373, ext. 4</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jdepalma@ons.org</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Modern health care has made it possible for many severely injured trauma patients to survive. This study was designed to assess the quality of life (QOL) of severely injured trauma survivors; determine areas of patients' lives most impacted, and community resources that were needed. A convenience sample of 64 adult patients discharged from a Level I trauma center were selected based upon a combination of the Severity of Injury Score (&gt; 25) and the Trauma Injury Score (&lt; .90). Telephone interviews were done in this descriptive study to administer the Sickness Impact Profile (SIP), QOL analogue scale, community resource measure and demographic data form. All patients were interviewed 6 to 12 months post-discharge. Most of SIP's behavior categories indicated severe disruption of QOL, especially when compared with other trauma studies. The behavior categories most negatively impacted were work., recreation &amp; pastimes, home management and sleep and rest. In some instances the most profound impact was on family members, with changes in lifestyle and roles. Community and medical resources were needed for longer periods of time than provided by third party payers. There are implications for trauma and rehabilitation centers, as well as community organizations and third party payers.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:25:59Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:25:59Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.