Salivary cortisol and depression in postpartum women participating in a study of kangaroo (skin-to-skin) care with preterm infants

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161711
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Salivary cortisol and depression in postpartum women participating in a study of kangaroo (skin-to-skin) care with preterm infants
Abstract:
Salivary cortisol and depression in postpartum women participating in a study of kangaroo (skin-to-skin) care with preterm infants
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2001
Author:Dombrowski, Mary
The postpartum period is a time of great physiological and psychological transition for many women, especially women giving birth to preterm infants. These women may be at greater risk for "postpartum blues," a phenomenon that occurs between Days 3-14 in 40-60% of postpartum women. Although postpartum blues are transitory, 20% of women experiencing them may develop postpartum depression. Cortisol, a physiologic index of stress, may also index postpartum blues (Ehlert, 1990). Kangaroo care (KC), wherein mothers hold their newborns skin-to-skin, is a nursing intervention that facilitates maternal relaxation, decreases stress, and alleviates feelings of depression (Affonso et al., 1989, 1993). Therefore this study, with 50 postpartum women who gave birth to 32-36 week infants and were randomly assigned to KC or control groups, was done to 1) determine the effect of KC on cortisol and depression and 2) describe the relationship between depression and cortisol. At 6 hours postbirth and twice daily on Days 1-5, saliva was collected on filter paper to measure cortisol, and a visual analogue scale was used to measure depression. Comparative and descriptive statistics will be used to analyze the data. These results will contribute to the ongoing exploration of the physiological mechanisms underlying postpartum depression.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSalivary cortisol and depression in postpartum women participating in a study of kangaroo (skin-to-skin) care with preterm infantsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161711-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Salivary cortisol and depression in postpartum women participating in a study of kangaroo (skin-to-skin) care with preterm infants</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Dombrowski, Mary</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The postpartum period is a time of great physiological and psychological transition for many women, especially women giving birth to preterm infants. These women may be at greater risk for &quot;postpartum blues,&quot; a phenomenon that occurs between Days 3-14 in 40-60% of postpartum women. Although postpartum blues are transitory, 20% of women experiencing them may develop postpartum depression. Cortisol, a physiologic index of stress, may also index postpartum blues (Ehlert, 1990). Kangaroo care (KC), wherein mothers hold their newborns skin-to-skin, is a nursing intervention that facilitates maternal relaxation, decreases stress, and alleviates feelings of depression (Affonso et al., 1989, 1993). Therefore this study, with 50 postpartum women who gave birth to 32-36 week infants and were randomly assigned to KC or control groups, was done to 1) determine the effect of KC on cortisol and depression and 2) describe the relationship between depression and cortisol. At 6 hours postbirth and twice daily on Days 1-5, saliva was collected on filter paper to measure cortisol, and a visual analogue scale was used to measure depression. Comparative and descriptive statistics will be used to analyze the data. These results will contribute to the ongoing exploration of the physiological mechanisms underlying postpartum depression.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:26:00Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:26:00Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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