Coaching plus cognitive strategies for persons with compromised urinary bladder syndrome

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161712
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Coaching plus cognitive strategies for persons with compromised urinary bladder syndrome
Abstract:
Coaching plus cognitive strategies for persons with compromised urinary bladder syndrome
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2001
Author:Dowd, Therese
P.I. Institution Name:University of Akron
Contact Address:College of Nursing 209 Carroll Street, Akron, OH, 44325-3701, USA
Contact Telephone:330.972.5924
The purpose of this experimental study was to determine the effectiveness of cognitive strategies (CS) and/or coaching for community-dwelling persons experiencing compromised urinary bladder syndrome (CUBS). CUBS consists of degrees of urinary frequency (UF) and/or urinary incontinence (UI). We hypothesized that coaching in addition to CS and information (group 3) would demonstrate better outcomes on comfort, bladder function, UI episodes, and perception of health than CS and information (group 2), or information only (group 1). Data collection is at three time points (baseline, four weeks, and four months). Group 3 received coaching, and groups 2 and 3 listened to audiotaped CS daily for four weeks. All groups received bladder health information that was reviewed regularly by data collectors. Repeated measures multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) will be used with one grouping factor (treatment group) and one repeated factor (time) to look for significant differences among the groups. Post hoc tests will follow for specific comparisons among groups. Findings should reveal that conservative approaches help persons with CUBS acquire improved outcomes. Implications for nursing include the provision of convenient first-line interventions for CUBS and demonstrating the importance of nursing support, as entailed in coaching, to augment the effectiveness of the intervention.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCoaching plus cognitive strategies for persons with compromised urinary bladder syndromeen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161712-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Coaching plus cognitive strategies for persons with compromised urinary bladder syndrome</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Dowd, Therese</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Akron</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing 209 Carroll Street, Akron, OH, 44325-3701, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">330.972.5924</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">tdowd@uakron.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of this experimental study was to determine the effectiveness of cognitive strategies (CS) and/or coaching for community-dwelling persons experiencing compromised urinary bladder syndrome (CUBS). CUBS consists of degrees of urinary frequency (UF) and/or urinary incontinence (UI). We hypothesized that coaching in addition to CS and information (group 3) would demonstrate better outcomes on comfort, bladder function, UI episodes, and perception of health than CS and information (group 2), or information only (group 1). Data collection is at three time points (baseline, four weeks, and four months). Group 3 received coaching, and groups 2 and 3 listened to audiotaped CS daily for four weeks. All groups received bladder health information that was reviewed regularly by data collectors. Repeated measures multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) will be used with one grouping factor (treatment group) and one repeated factor (time) to look for significant differences among the groups. Post hoc tests will follow for specific comparisons among groups. Findings should reveal that conservative approaches help persons with CUBS acquire improved outcomes. Implications for nursing include the provision of convenient first-line interventions for CUBS and demonstrating the importance of nursing support, as entailed in coaching, to augment the effectiveness of the intervention.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:26:01Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:26:01Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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