Learning the harsh realities of life: Sexual violence, disillusionment, and meaning

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161713
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Learning the harsh realities of life: Sexual violence, disillusionment, and meaning
Abstract:
Learning the harsh realities of life: Sexual violence, disillusionment, and meaning
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2001
Author:Draucker, Claire, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Kent State University
Title:Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing, PO Box 5190, Kent, OH, 44242-0001, USA
Contact Telephone:330.672.3686
Purpose: To explore how women find meaning in experiences of sexual violence. Theoretical/Conceptual Framework: Lerner's Just World Theory. Sample and Method: Data were provided by forty-four women who had experienced sexual abuse or assault by intimate others. In audio-taped, open-ended interviews, the women described how they coped with their experiences of violence. All information related to the process of finding meaning was highlighted on the transcripts and examined using constant comparison analysis. Results: The women indicated that their victimizing experiences had taught them "the harsh realities of life" - that is, the world is violent and society tolerates and, in some cases, promotes violence against women. This lesson forced them to take it upon themselves to create a better life. This psychosocial process of "taking it upon oneself" involved three tasks: pursuing one's own safety, taking justice into their own hands, and making something good out of something bad. By accomplishing these tasks, the women found meaning in their suffering. Discussion: The women's narratives provoke critique of existing social structures that compel women to seek safety, justice, and goodness on their own. Soliciting narratives of women's life experiences with violence appears to be a strategy that facilitates meaning-making.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleLearning the harsh realities of life: Sexual violence, disillusionment, and meaningen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161713-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Learning the harsh realities of life: Sexual violence, disillusionment, and meaning</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Draucker, Claire, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Kent State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, PO Box 5190, Kent, OH, 44242-0001, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">330.672.3686</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">cdraucke@kent.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: To explore how women find meaning in experiences of sexual violence. Theoretical/Conceptual Framework: Lerner's Just World Theory. Sample and Method: Data were provided by forty-four women who had experienced sexual abuse or assault by intimate others. In audio-taped, open-ended interviews, the women described how they coped with their experiences of violence. All information related to the process of finding meaning was highlighted on the transcripts and examined using constant comparison analysis. Results: The women indicated that their victimizing experiences had taught them &quot;the harsh realities of life&quot; - that is, the world is violent and society tolerates and, in some cases, promotes violence against women. This lesson forced them to take it upon themselves to create a better life. This psychosocial process of &quot;taking it upon oneself&quot; involved three tasks: pursuing one's own safety, taking justice into their own hands, and making something good out of something bad. By accomplishing these tasks, the women found meaning in their suffering. Discussion: The women's narratives provoke critique of existing social structures that compel women to seek safety, justice, and goodness on their own. Soliciting narratives of women's life experiences with violence appears to be a strategy that facilitates meaning-making.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:26:02Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:26:02Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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