2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161718
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Age, gender, and adults’ beliefs about sleep
Abstract:
Age, gender, and adults’ beliefs about sleep
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2001
Author:Floyd, Judith, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Wayne State University
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 300 Cohn, 5557 Cass Avenue, Detroit, MI, 48202, USA
Contact Telephone:313.577.4383
Chronic insomnia is a debilitating condition that affects 10-20% of otherwise healthy Americans. The incidence is greater in women and older adults. It is known that dysfunctional beliefs about sleep help maintain chronic insomnia, but little research addresses the measurement of sleep beliefs. This research examined a previously identified factor structure for the Floyd-Medler Sleep Belief Scale (FMSBS) and explored background characteristics associated with healthy adults' beliefs about sleep. Subjects (N=302, ages 35-80) completed the 60-item FMSBS. Results confirmed the original five-factor structure indicating that healthy adults have beliefs about: (a) short term and (b) long term consequences of poor sleep, (c) importance of sufficient sleep, (d) importance of regular sleep, and (e) how to cope with poor sleep. A confirmatory factor analysis showed that all factor loadings were significant. The model demonstrated overall goodness of fit as evidenced by C2 (80 df)=118.40 (p<.01), RMSEA=.04, GFI=.95, NNFI=.94, and CFI=.96. Age was correlated with stronger beliefs about short-term and long-term consequences (p<.001). Beliefs about the importance of sufficient sleep were stronger for men than women (p<.01). The factor structure of the FMSBS appears stable, sensitive to age and gender differences, and ready for further use in insomnia research.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAge, gender, and adults’ beliefs about sleepen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161718-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Age, gender, and adults&rsquo; beliefs about sleep</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Floyd, Judith, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Wayne State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 300 Cohn, 5557 Cass Avenue, Detroit, MI, 48202, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">313.577.4383</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">judith.floyd@wayne.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Chronic insomnia is a debilitating condition that affects 10-20% of otherwise healthy Americans. The incidence is greater in women and older adults. It is known that dysfunctional beliefs about sleep help maintain chronic insomnia, but little research addresses the measurement of sleep beliefs. This research examined a previously identified factor structure for the Floyd-Medler Sleep Belief Scale (FMSBS) and explored background characteristics associated with healthy adults' beliefs about sleep. Subjects (N=302, ages 35-80) completed the 60-item FMSBS. Results confirmed the original five-factor structure indicating that healthy adults have beliefs about: (a) short term and (b) long term consequences of poor sleep, (c) importance of sufficient sleep, (d) importance of regular sleep, and (e) how to cope with poor sleep. A confirmatory factor analysis showed that all factor loadings were significant. The model demonstrated overall goodness of fit as evidenced by C2 (80 df)=118.40 (p&lt;.01), RMSEA=.04, GFI=.95, NNFI=.94, and CFI=.96. Age was correlated with stronger beliefs about short-term and long-term consequences (p&lt;.001). Beliefs about the importance of sufficient sleep were stronger for men than women (p&lt;.01). The factor structure of the FMSBS appears stable, sensitive to age and gender differences, and ready for further use in insomnia research.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:26:08Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:26:08Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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