2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161726
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Character and ethical behavior of nurses
Abstract:
Character and ethical behavior of nurses
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2001
Author:Godfrey, Nelda
P.I. Institution Name:William Jewell College
Contact Address:Department of Nursing, 500 College Hill, Liberty, MO, 64068, USA
Contact Telephone:816.781.7700, ext. 5
This study examined relationships among personal normative characteristics, personal descriptive characteristics, and ethical behavior of nurses. One hundred thirty one registered nurses with a minimum of six months' experience in direct care in urban, suburban, or rural hospitals participated in the study. Three instruments were used with the randomized sample: (a) Demographic Data Form, (b) The INSURE Survey, a pre-employment screening tool, and (c) the Ethical Behavior Test (EBT), an instrument based on Kohlberg's moral development theory. Research design was descriptive, correlational, and multivariate. Personal descriptive characteristic variables were (a) age, (b) years in practice, (c) education, and (d) practice setting. Personal normative characteristic variables were moral attitudes of (a) integrity, (b) reliability, and (c) work ethic. The ethical behavior variable measured nurses' ethical reasoning. Findings indicated that two variables, associate degree preparation and years of practice, predicted higher integrity scores. On average, nurses' integrity, reliability, and work ethic scores indicated they possessed attitudes desired and rewarded in the workplace. Results suggest empirical assessment of character is complicated. Nurses' moral attitude scores are consistent with the public trust accorded them. Recommendations include refinement of the EBT and involvement of practicing nurses in all stages of virtue ethics research in nursing.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCharacter and ethical behavior of nursesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161726-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Character and ethical behavior of nurses</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Godfrey, Nelda</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">William Jewell College</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Department of Nursing, 500 College Hill, Liberty, MO, 64068, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">816.781.7700, ext. 5</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">godfreyn@william.jewell.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">This study examined relationships among personal normative characteristics, personal descriptive characteristics, and ethical behavior of nurses. One hundred thirty one registered nurses with a minimum of six months' experience in direct care in urban, suburban, or rural hospitals participated in the study. Three instruments were used with the randomized sample: (a) Demographic Data Form, (b) The INSURE Survey, a pre-employment screening tool, and (c) the Ethical Behavior Test (EBT), an instrument based on Kohlberg's moral development theory. Research design was descriptive, correlational, and multivariate. Personal descriptive characteristic variables were (a) age, (b) years in practice, (c) education, and (d) practice setting. Personal normative characteristic variables were moral attitudes of (a) integrity, (b) reliability, and (c) work ethic. The ethical behavior variable measured nurses' ethical reasoning. Findings indicated that two variables, associate degree preparation and years of practice, predicted higher integrity scores. On average, nurses' integrity, reliability, and work ethic scores indicated they possessed attitudes desired and rewarded in the workplace. Results suggest empirical assessment of character is complicated. Nurses' moral attitude scores are consistent with the public trust accorded them. Recommendations include refinement of the EBT and involvement of practicing nurses in all stages of virtue ethics research in nursing.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:26:16Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:26:16Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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