2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161729
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Marginalization of women abuse survivors with substance misuse problems
Abstract:
Marginalization of women abuse survivors with substance misuse problems
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2001
Author:Hall, Joanne, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Tennessee
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 1200 Volunteer Boulevard, Room 335, Knoxville, TN, 37996-4180, USA
Contact Telephone:865.974.5769
Purpose: Approximately 30% of women have been abused as children. Abuse refers to verbal, physical,sexual maltreatment and/or neglect. Women with child abuse and substance misuse histories are multiply stigmatized. Analysis of two pooled data sets(n=45)focused on the concept of marginalization to illuminate dynamics of social stigmatization and survivors' responses to these processes. Theoretical Framework: The basic perspective is critical theory. Marginalization is peripheralization from the dominant majority based on identities, associations and experiences. Components of marginalization include: differentiation, voice, power, secrecy,and eurocentrism. Sample: Urban-dwelling women with histories of child abuse and drug problems were interviewed for two hours. More than half were women of color and 90% were low-income. Methods: The data were collected in two critical narrative studies with similar participants. Thematic coding and narrative techniques were used for analysis. Components of marginalization were compared to the findings and representative quotes were found. Results and Conclusions: Narratives used as testimony exemplify risks and resilience in women stigmatized by socioeconomic status, ethnicity, race, victimization and addiction. These findings contextualize stigmatizing experiences as social and political. Clearer understanding women abuse survivors as marginalized persons will facilitate tailored interventions to maximize mental health.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMarginalization of women abuse survivors with substance misuse problemsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161729-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Marginalization of women abuse survivors with substance misuse problems</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Hall, Joanne, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Tennessee</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 1200 Volunteer Boulevard, Room 335, Knoxville, TN, 37996-4180, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">865.974.5769</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jhall7@utk.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Approximately 30% of women have been abused as children. Abuse refers to verbal, physical,sexual maltreatment and/or neglect. Women with child abuse and substance misuse histories are multiply stigmatized. Analysis of two pooled data sets(n=45)focused on the concept of marginalization to illuminate dynamics of social stigmatization and survivors' responses to these processes. Theoretical Framework: The basic perspective is critical theory. Marginalization is peripheralization from the dominant majority based on identities, associations and experiences. Components of marginalization include: differentiation, voice, power, secrecy,and eurocentrism. Sample: Urban-dwelling women with histories of child abuse and drug problems were interviewed for two hours. More than half were women of color and 90% were low-income. Methods: The data were collected in two critical narrative studies with similar participants. Thematic coding and narrative techniques were used for analysis. Components of marginalization were compared to the findings and representative quotes were found. Results and Conclusions: Narratives used as testimony exemplify risks and resilience in women stigmatized by socioeconomic status, ethnicity, race, victimization and addiction. These findings contextualize stigmatizing experiences as social and political. Clearer understanding women abuse survivors as marginalized persons will facilitate tailored interventions to maximize mental health.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:26:20Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:26:20Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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