2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161733
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Adult failure to thrive in the older rehabilitation patient
Abstract:
Adult failure to thrive in the older rehabilitation patient
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2001
Author:Higgins, Patricia, MSN/MN/MNSc/MNE
P.I. Institution Name:Case Western Reserve University
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH, 44106, USA
Contact Telephone:216.368.8850
Increasing numbers of hospitalized patients require therapy at a rehabilitation facility before discharge to home or another facility. Nurses recognize that these patients have multiple problems and that malnutrition, limited physical functioning, and mood state may be important predictors of patient outcomes. These factors also are thought to be associated with adult failure to thrive (FTT), a syndrome characterized by a lower than expected level of functioning that is frequently associated with nutritional deficits. Using a multidimensional conceptual model of FTT, this pilot study tested a tool developed to determine the feasibility of detecting FTT indicators on admission to a long-term rehabilitation unit. The patient's medical record and Minimum Data Set Plus (MDS+) were used to assess four domains of FTT (nutrition, functional status, cognitive status, and psychological status) in 30 adults > 55 years. A descriptive longitudinal design also was used to collect data describing the patient's mood state and document change during the hospitalization. Data collection issues related to enrollment and retention of subjects and chart abstraction will be addressed.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAdult failure to thrive in the older rehabilitation patienten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161733-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Adult failure to thrive in the older rehabilitation patient</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Higgins, Patricia, MSN/MN/MNSc/MNE</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Case Western Reserve University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH, 44106, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">216.368.8850</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">pxg3@po.cwru.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Increasing numbers of hospitalized patients require therapy at a rehabilitation facility before discharge to home or another facility. Nurses recognize that these patients have multiple problems and that malnutrition, limited physical functioning, and mood state may be important predictors of patient outcomes. These factors also are thought to be associated with adult failure to thrive (FTT), a syndrome characterized by a lower than expected level of functioning that is frequently associated with nutritional deficits. Using a multidimensional conceptual model of FTT, this pilot study tested a tool developed to determine the feasibility of detecting FTT indicators on admission to a long-term rehabilitation unit. The patient's medical record and Minimum Data Set Plus (MDS+) were used to assess four domains of FTT (nutrition, functional status, cognitive status, and psychological status) in 30 adults &gt; 55 years. A descriptive longitudinal design also was used to collect data describing the patient's mood state and document change during the hospitalization. Data collection issues related to enrollment and retention of subjects and chart abstraction will be addressed.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:26:24Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:26:24Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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