2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161736
Type:
Presentation
Title:
School-aged homeless sheltered children’s stressors and coping strategies
Abstract:
School-aged homeless sheltered children’s stressors and coping strategies
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2001
Author:Huang, Chu-Yu
P.I. Institution Name:Cedarville University
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:Department of Nursing, 251 North Main Street, Cedarville, OH, 45314, USA
Homeless children experience significantly more stressors than domiciled children of the same age, which may leave them at risk for negative consequences. More information on their stressors and coping strategies is necessary to develop interventions. The purpose of this study was to examine the stressors and coping strategies of sheltered school-aged homeless children. A secondary analysis of qualitative data from a cross-sectional study of homeless and domiciled poor children was conducted. A content analysis on the interview data from thirty sheltered homeless children, 8-12 years old, was done to delineate stressors and coping strategies categories. Homeless, family, self, peer, school and violent behavior were the stressor categories. The children expressed more stressors in homeless, family and self categories. The coping strategies were categorized using Ryan-Wenger’s (1992) coping taxonomy. The majority of the children’s coping strategies were in the social support, cognitive avoidance and behavioral distraction categories. Future research is needed regarding other variables that might influence homeless children’s stress-coping processes. Nurses should assess homeless children’s stressors and coping strategies. Based on the assessment, nurses can work with the individual child and parent to alleviate stressors by strengthening one’s coping strategies, and developing new coping strategies that lead to positive outcomes.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSchool-aged homeless sheltered children’s stressors and coping strategiesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161736-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">School-aged homeless sheltered children&rsquo;s stressors and coping strategies</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Huang, Chu-Yu</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Cedarville University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Department of Nursing, 251 North Main Street, Cedarville, OH, 45314, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">huang.76@osu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Homeless children experience significantly more stressors than domiciled children of the same age, which may leave them at risk for negative consequences. More information on their stressors and coping strategies is necessary to develop interventions. The purpose of this study was to examine the stressors and coping strategies of sheltered school-aged homeless children. A secondary analysis of qualitative data from a cross-sectional study of homeless and domiciled poor children was conducted. A content analysis on the interview data from thirty sheltered homeless children, 8-12 years old, was done to delineate stressors and coping strategies categories. Homeless, family, self, peer, school and violent behavior were the stressor categories. The children expressed more stressors in homeless, family and self categories. The coping strategies were categorized using Ryan-Wenger&rsquo;s (1992) coping taxonomy. The majority of the children&rsquo;s coping strategies were in the social support, cognitive avoidance and behavioral distraction categories. Future research is needed regarding other variables that might influence homeless children&rsquo;s stress-coping processes. Nurses should assess homeless children&rsquo;s stressors and coping strategies. Based on the assessment, nurses can work with the individual child and parent to alleviate stressors by strengthening one&rsquo;s coping strategies, and developing new coping strategies that lead to positive outcomes.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:26:28Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:26:28Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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