2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161740
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Perceived restorative activities of community-dwelling elders
Abstract:
Perceived restorative activities of community-dwelling elders
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2001
Author:Jansen, Debra, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 105 Garfield Avenue, Box 4004, 215 Nursing - UWEC, Eau Claire, WI, 54702-4004, USA
Contact Telephone:715.836.5183
Cognitive means of enhancing and maintaining the capacity to direct attention (CDA), i.e., to concentrate, are important for elders as this ability declines with age. Based on the Kaplan and Kaplan Framework of Directed Attentional Fatigue and Restoration, exposure to mentally restorative activities (e.g., observing nature) is theoretically associated with improved CDA and feelings of greater mental energy, peacefulness, and refreshment. However, little literature exists regarding the benefits and types of restorative activities engaged in by elders. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to identify activities elders perceive as restorative. Thirty (28 females, 2 males) community-dwelling elders (ages 65-92 years; M=75 years) were interviewed using open-ended questions to identify activities they find personally restorative. A content analysis of themes produced 14 categories of restorative activities: family connections; social connections; creative outlets; nature; physical activity; spirituality and reflection; altruism; pets; indulgences; reading; cognitive challenges; cultural activities; spectator activities; and travel. Information from this study may be useful to researchers and clinicians interested in designing and testing the effectiveness of restorative interventions with elders. Future research involves assessing the relationships between restorative activities and CDA and quality of life.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePerceived restorative activities of community-dwelling eldersen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161740-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Perceived restorative activities of community-dwelling elders</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Jansen, Debra, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 105 Garfield Avenue, Box 4004, 215 Nursing - UWEC, Eau Claire, WI, 54702-4004, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">715.836.5183</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jansenda@uwec.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Cognitive means of enhancing and maintaining the capacity to direct attention (CDA), i.e., to concentrate, are important for elders as this ability declines with age. Based on the Kaplan and Kaplan Framework of Directed Attentional Fatigue and Restoration, exposure to mentally restorative activities (e.g., observing nature) is theoretically associated with improved CDA and feelings of greater mental energy, peacefulness, and refreshment. However, little literature exists regarding the benefits and types of restorative activities engaged in by elders. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to identify activities elders perceive as restorative. Thirty (28 females, 2 males) community-dwelling elders (ages 65-92 years; M=75 years) were interviewed using open-ended questions to identify activities they find personally restorative. A content analysis of themes produced 14 categories of restorative activities: family connections; social connections; creative outlets; nature; physical activity; spirituality and reflection; altruism; pets; indulgences; reading; cognitive challenges; cultural activities; spectator activities; and travel. Information from this study may be useful to researchers and clinicians interested in designing and testing the effectiveness of restorative interventions with elders. Future research involves assessing the relationships between restorative activities and CDA and quality of life.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:26:32Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:26:32Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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