Effects of guided imagery on pain intensity in adolescents with sickle cell anemia

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161741
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Effects of guided imagery on pain intensity in adolescents with sickle cell anemia
Abstract:
Effects of guided imagery on pain intensity in adolescents with sickle cell anemia
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2001
Author:Jordan, Denise
P.I. Institution Name:Southern Illinois University
Contact Address:School of Nursing, Alumni Hall, Room 2331, Edwardsville, IL, 62026-1066, USA
Contact Telephone:618.650.3956
Sickle cell anemia (SCA) is a genetic disorder that is prevalent in persons of African Americans. Affected persons suffer from numerous complications, one being pain. Guided imagery (GI) incorporates relaxation of the muscles and directed focusing on images formed in the mind. The purpose of this pilot study was to describe the use of GI in reducing pain intensity in adolescents with SCA. All current treatment regimens were continued throughout this study. A convenience sample of twelve participants was recruited and randomly assigned to the experimental or control group. Participants were required to complete two instruments measuring pain intensity. GI teaching was given to the experimental group, but not to control group. Although the sample size was insufficient to make inferences to a larger population, the data obtained still provided vital information in implementing a non-pharmacological therapy in the management of pain. The instruments used to measure pain were, McGill Pain Questionnaire-Short Form(MPQ) and the Faces Pain Scale (FPS)/Numeric Scale (NS) which measured pain intensity. Results indicated that GI was associated with a significant reduction in pain intensity in mild to moderate pain episodes.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEffects of guided imagery on pain intensity in adolescents with sickle cell anemiaen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161741-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Effects of guided imagery on pain intensity in adolescents with sickle cell anemia</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Jordan, Denise</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Southern Illinois University</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, Alumni Hall, Room 2331, Edwardsville, IL, 62026-1066, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">618.650.3956</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">dejordan62@yahoo.com</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Sickle cell anemia (SCA) is a genetic disorder that is prevalent in persons of African Americans. Affected persons suffer from numerous complications, one being pain. Guided imagery (GI) incorporates relaxation of the muscles and directed focusing on images formed in the mind. The purpose of this pilot study was to describe the use of GI in reducing pain intensity in adolescents with SCA. All current treatment regimens were continued throughout this study. A convenience sample of twelve participants was recruited and randomly assigned to the experimental or control group. Participants were required to complete two instruments measuring pain intensity. GI teaching was given to the experimental group, but not to control group. Although the sample size was insufficient to make inferences to a larger population, the data obtained still provided vital information in implementing a non-pharmacological therapy in the management of pain. The instruments used to measure pain were, McGill Pain Questionnaire-Short Form(MPQ) and the Faces Pain Scale (FPS)/Numeric Scale (NS) which measured pain intensity. Results indicated that GI was associated with a significant reduction in pain intensity in mild to moderate pain episodes.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:26:33Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:26:33Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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