2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161742
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Foot massage as a pain management strategy
Abstract:
Foot massage as a pain management strategy
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2001
Author:Brewer, Sherry
P.I. Institution Name:Indiana University
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 1111 Middle Drive, NU 317-B, Indianapolis, IN, 46202-5107, USA
Post-operative pain is a common sequella for patients following hip and knee replacement surgery. Research suggests that post-operative pain is poorly controlled. Medications are often insufficient to produce adequate pain relief. Complementary strategies are needed to aid in the relief of pain. Massage of feet may be an effective pain reduction based on the neuropathways involved in pain perception and modulation. Neurons transmitting noxious information synapse in the spinal cord. Interneurons containing enkephalin can modify synaptic transmission by preventing transmission of the nociceptive signal to the next neuron in the pain pathway. Foot massage activates enkephalin releasing neurons which actively block the transmission of the nociceptive signal. The purpose of the repeated measures study was to determine if massage would decrease pain intensity and distress among a convenience sample of 32 individuals. Massage was applied to each foot for five minutes. An 11-point numerical scale measured pain intensity, A 0 to 6 verbal descriptor measured distress. Pain was significantly reduced following the left foot massage which was further reduced following the right foot massage. Massage to the feet holds promise as a cost-effective, easily applied pain reduction strategy for patients with hip or knee replacement surgery.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFoot massage as a pain management strategyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161742-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Foot massage as a pain management strategy</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Brewer, Sherry</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Indiana University</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 1111 Middle Drive, NU 317-B, Indianapolis, IN, 46202-5107, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">bbrwcrpt@compuserve.com</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Post-operative pain is a common sequella for patients following hip and knee replacement surgery. Research suggests that post-operative pain is poorly controlled. Medications are often insufficient to produce adequate pain relief. Complementary strategies are needed to aid in the relief of pain. Massage of feet may be an effective pain reduction based on the neuropathways involved in pain perception and modulation. Neurons transmitting noxious information synapse in the spinal cord. Interneurons containing enkephalin can modify synaptic transmission by preventing transmission of the nociceptive signal to the next neuron in the pain pathway. Foot massage activates enkephalin releasing neurons which actively block the transmission of the nociceptive signal. The purpose of the repeated measures study was to determine if massage would decrease pain intensity and distress among a convenience sample of 32 individuals. Massage was applied to each foot for five minutes. An 11-point numerical scale measured pain intensity, A 0 to 6 verbal descriptor measured distress. Pain was significantly reduced following the left foot massage which was further reduced following the right foot massage. Massage to the feet holds promise as a cost-effective, easily applied pain reduction strategy for patients with hip or knee replacement surgery.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:26:34Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:26:34Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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