2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161749
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Inspiratory muscle strength in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease
Abstract:
Inspiratory muscle strength in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2001
Author:Larson, Janet, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Illinois at Chicago
Title:Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 845 South Damen Avenue, M/C 802, 706 NURS, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA
Contact Telephone:312.996.7955
People with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) experience a decrease in functional strength of the inspiratory muscles that contributes to dyspnea. The underlying mechanisms for loss of strength are not well understood. The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between inspiratory muscle strength and potential contributing factors, ultimately to guide nursing interventions. The sample was 102 people with COPD (mean(SD)): age 65(7)yrs, FEV1 50(18)% predicted, PaO2 78(12) mm Hg. Measures included: inspiratory muscle strength (maximal inspiratory pressure (PImax)), chest hyperinflation (residual volume/ total lung capacity (RV/TLC)), body composition (dual energy x-ray absorptiometry) and peripheral muscle strength (isokinetic strength of knee extensors and flexors and handgrip strength). Descriptive statistics: PImax 81(24)% predicted, RV/TLC 57(08)%, lean body mass 51(10) kg, fat mass 23(08) kg, lean body mass index 18(3) and peripheral strength 81(16)% predicted. PImax was associated with hyperinflation (r=-.39) and peripheral muscle strength (r=.38). Stepwise regression revealed that hyperinflation and peripheral muscle strength accounted for 25% of the variance in inspiratory muscle strength, 14% and 11% respectively. In conclusion chronic hyperinflation has a weaker relationship and physical deconditioning has a stronger relationship to functional strength of the inspiratory muscles than previously recognized.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleInspiratory muscle strength in chronic obstructive pulmonary diseaseen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161749-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Inspiratory muscle strength in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Larson, Janet, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Illinois at Chicago</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 845 South Damen Avenue, M/C 802, 706 NURS, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">312.996.7955</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jllarson@uic.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">People with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) experience a decrease in functional strength of the inspiratory muscles that contributes to dyspnea. The underlying mechanisms for loss of strength are not well understood. The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between inspiratory muscle strength and potential contributing factors, ultimately to guide nursing interventions. The sample was 102 people with COPD (mean(SD)): age 65(7)yrs, FEV1 50(18)% predicted, PaO2 78(12) mm Hg. Measures included: inspiratory muscle strength (maximal inspiratory pressure (PImax)), chest hyperinflation (residual volume/ total lung capacity (RV/TLC)), body composition (dual energy x-ray absorptiometry) and peripheral muscle strength (isokinetic strength of knee extensors and flexors and handgrip strength). Descriptive statistics: PImax 81(24)% predicted, RV/TLC 57(08)%, lean body mass 51(10) kg, fat mass 23(08) kg, lean body mass index 18(3) and peripheral strength 81(16)% predicted. PImax was associated with hyperinflation (r=-.39) and peripheral muscle strength (r=.38). Stepwise regression revealed that hyperinflation and peripheral muscle strength accounted for 25% of the variance in inspiratory muscle strength, 14% and 11% respectively. In conclusion chronic hyperinflation has a weaker relationship and physical deconditioning has a stronger relationship to functional strength of the inspiratory muscles than previously recognized.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:26:42Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:26:42Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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