2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161752
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Investing in self-care: A midrange theory to reverse self-care neglect
Abstract:
Investing in self-care: A midrange theory to reverse self-care neglect
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2001
Author:Leenerts, Mary
P.I. Institution Name:University of Kansas Medical Center
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 3901 Rainbow Boulevard, Kansas City, KS, 66160, USA
Contact Telephone:913.588.3377
Self-care practices of HIV+ incarcerated women were investigated in this grounded theory study. Specific Aims were to: a) Explore women's perceptions of self-care; b) Identify factors that promote or constrain self-care; and c) Develop midrange theory promoting self-care practices. Research addressing self-care in this population is significant because of the high incidence of self-care neglect combined with vulnerability to poor physical and mental health. Findings of this study demonstrate vulnerability over time and the persistent influence on self-care. This qualitative-descriptive study utilized symbolic interactionism as a meaning centered framework for discovering relevant interactions shaping self-care. Constant comparative analysis and three levels of coding (open, selective and theoretical) were used in data analysis. Participants included 22 HIV+ incarcerated women in a state prison in the southeastern United States. All women spoke English; eighteen were African-American and four were Euro-American. The basic psychosocial process of Connecting with Self-Care revealed a process that influenced self-care attitudes and behaviors. The theory of "Investing in Self-Care" captures four major connections: a) Investing in Self; b) Investing in Relationships; c) Investing in Resources; and d) Investing in Meaning. Clinical applications of the theory will be addressed with emphasis on self-care that supports transition into the community.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleInvesting in self-care: A midrange theory to reverse self-care neglecten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161752-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Investing in self-care: A midrange theory to reverse self-care neglect</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Leenerts, Mary</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Kansas Medical Center</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 3901 Rainbow Boulevard, Kansas City, KS, 66160, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">913.588.3377</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mleenerts@kumc.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Self-care practices of HIV+ incarcerated women were investigated in this grounded theory study. Specific Aims were to: a) Explore women's perceptions of self-care; b) Identify factors that promote or constrain self-care; and c) Develop midrange theory promoting self-care practices. Research addressing self-care in this population is significant because of the high incidence of self-care neglect combined with vulnerability to poor physical and mental health. Findings of this study demonstrate vulnerability over time and the persistent influence on self-care. This qualitative-descriptive study utilized symbolic interactionism as a meaning centered framework for discovering relevant interactions shaping self-care. Constant comparative analysis and three levels of coding (open, selective and theoretical) were used in data analysis. Participants included 22 HIV+ incarcerated women in a state prison in the southeastern United States. All women spoke English; eighteen were African-American and four were Euro-American. The basic psychosocial process of Connecting with Self-Care revealed a process that influenced self-care attitudes and behaviors. The theory of &quot;Investing in Self-Care&quot; captures four major connections: a) Investing in Self; b) Investing in Relationships; c) Investing in Resources; and d) Investing in Meaning. Clinical applications of the theory will be addressed with emphasis on self-care that supports transition into the community.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:26:45Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:26:45Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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