2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161755
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Nurses and physicians: A review of JAMA, 1883-1935
Abstract:
Nurses and physicians: A review of JAMA, 1883-1935
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2001
Author:Lusk, Brigid
P.I. Institution Name:Northern Illinois University
Contact Address:School of Nursing, DeKalb, IL, 60115, USA
Contact Telephone:815.753.0663
Purpose: This historical paper explores and analyzes nursing-related literature from the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) from 1883 to 1935, to assess one aspect of early inter-professional relations. Framework/Sample/Method: External events, such as the increased cost of medical care, with the concomitant threat of socialized medicine, provided the framework through which references to nursing were interpreted. Guided by historical research methodology, all issues of JAMA, from its inception until the peak of the Great Depression, were reviewed for references to nursing. Results and Conclusions: In the 1880s, organized medicine warmly welcomed trained nurses, and conceded that more training schools for nurses and less “diploma-mills” for doctors were needed. Yet assumption of medical control over nursing education was tacitly implied. Through the 1890s and 1900s, amidst a storm of literature exposing and lamenting inferior medical education and medicine’s low status, opposition to well-educated nurses increased. As the costs of medical care became a contentious issue, nurses’ fees were discussed. As medical education became more exclusive, nurses’ subordinate role was delineated. The “nursing problem” became less evident as concerns related to health insurance increased. This research illustrated the complexity and interdependent nature of early professional relations between nursing and medicine.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNurses and physicians: A review of JAMA, 1883-1935en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161755-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Nurses and physicians: A review of JAMA, 1883-1935</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Lusk, Brigid</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Northern Illinois University</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, DeKalb, IL, 60115, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">815.753.0663</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">blusk@niu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: This historical paper explores and analyzes nursing-related literature from the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) from 1883 to 1935, to assess one aspect of early inter-professional relations. Framework/Sample/Method: External events, such as the increased cost of medical care, with the concomitant threat of socialized medicine, provided the framework through which references to nursing were interpreted. Guided by historical research methodology, all issues of JAMA, from its inception until the peak of the Great Depression, were reviewed for references to nursing. Results and Conclusions: In the 1880s, organized medicine warmly welcomed trained nurses, and conceded that more training schools for nurses and less &ldquo;diploma-mills&rdquo; for doctors were needed. Yet assumption of medical control over nursing education was tacitly implied. Through the 1890s and 1900s, amidst a storm of literature exposing and lamenting inferior medical education and medicine&rsquo;s low status, opposition to well-educated nurses increased. As the costs of medical care became a contentious issue, nurses&rsquo; fees were discussed. As medical education became more exclusive, nurses&rsquo; subordinate role was delineated. The &ldquo;nursing problem&rdquo; became less evident as concerns related to health insurance increased. This research illustrated the complexity and interdependent nature of early professional relations between nursing and medicine.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:26:49Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:26:49Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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