Development of premature infants receiving kangaroo care (skin-to-skin) in a randomized controlled trial

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161762
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Development of premature infants receiving kangaroo care (skin-to-skin) in a randomized controlled trial
Abstract:
Development of premature infants receiving kangaroo care (skin-to-skin) in a randomized controlled trial
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2001
Author:Mowder, Angela
Early childhood experiences impact many aspects of a child's development. Preterm infants have immature neurological development at birth and thus are at greater risk for developmental delays compared to fullterm infants. Early noninvasive interventions aimed to promote neurological stability may decrease this risk. Generally kangaroo care (KC) improves physical health and promotes quiet sleep in premature infants. During KC, mothers hold their diaper-clad infants skin-to-skin and chest-to-chest; infants stop crying, relax, and sleep for long periods. Thus KC may prevent postnatal cerebral insults and subsequent developmental problems. However, longterm effects of KC on neurologic development have not been studied before. In this randomized controlled trial, mothers and their 32-36 week infants were assigned to receive either KC or standard care (N=100). The KC group experienced KC as soon, as often, and as long as possible Days 1-5 postbirth. Infants are assessed with the Bayley Developmental Scales at 18-month corrected age follow-up visits (70% return rate). Twenty-five infants have returned for follow-up; a projected 50 infants will be assessed by March 2001. Data will be analyzed with descriptive statistics and independent sample t-tests. Results will provide valuable information regarding effects of this early, noninvasive, nonpainful, gentle intervention on preterm infant development.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDevelopment of premature infants receiving kangaroo care (skin-to-skin) in a randomized controlled trialen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161762-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Development of premature infants receiving kangaroo care (skin-to-skin) in a randomized controlled trial</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Mowder, Angela</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">angiemowder@yahoo.com</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Early childhood experiences impact many aspects of a child's development. Preterm infants have immature neurological development at birth and thus are at greater risk for developmental delays compared to fullterm infants. Early noninvasive interventions aimed to promote neurological stability may decrease this risk. Generally kangaroo care (KC) improves physical health and promotes quiet sleep in premature infants. During KC, mothers hold their diaper-clad infants skin-to-skin and chest-to-chest; infants stop crying, relax, and sleep for long periods. Thus KC may prevent postnatal cerebral insults and subsequent developmental problems. However, longterm effects of KC on neurologic development have not been studied before. In this randomized controlled trial, mothers and their 32-36 week infants were assigned to receive either KC or standard care (N=100). The KC group experienced KC as soon, as often, and as long as possible Days 1-5 postbirth. Infants are assessed with the Bayley Developmental Scales at 18-month corrected age follow-up visits (70% return rate). Twenty-five infants have returned for follow-up; a projected 50 infants will be assessed by March 2001. Data will be analyzed with descriptive statistics and independent sample t-tests. Results will provide valuable information regarding effects of this early, noninvasive, nonpainful, gentle intervention on preterm infant development.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:26:56Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:26:56Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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