2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161765
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Shifting survival expectations for people with HIV/AIDS
Abstract:
Shifting survival expectations for people with HIV/AIDS
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2001
Author:Nelson, Margot, MS/MSc
P.I. Institution Name:Augustana College
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 2001 South Summit Avenue, Sioux Falls, SD, 57197, USA
Contact Telephone:605.274.4729
Until the mid-1990s, HIV-infected individuals typically experienced gradual disease progression and early death. Newer therapies have dramatically reversed this unrelenting progression for many people. Recipients of the newer therapies now face a new challenge: possible long-term survival. Little research has focused upon the meaning of this transition in people's lives. The purpose of this research is to describe the experience of American and Australian HIV-infected individuals who have faced the prospect of early death and then experienced dramatic improvement in their health, raising the possibility of longer term survival. Ten participants from two Midwestern sites in the United States and ten from urban New South Wales, Australia, have agreed to participate. Hermeneutic phenomenology is used to engage each participant in focussing on his/her lived experience and meanings discovered in that experience.Tapes and verbatim transcripts are reviewed by all investigators in collaboration with an expert consultant. Theme identification and interpretation is conducted iteratively by the investigators, comparing themes across participants and comparing the experiences of Australian and American participants. Collaboration among researchers and the consultant is facilitated by email, teleconferencing, and real-time discussions via NetMeeting (an internet conferencing program).
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleShifting survival expectations for people with HIV/AIDSen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161765-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Shifting survival expectations for people with HIV/AIDS</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Nelson, Margot, MS/MSc</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Augustana College</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 2001 South Summit Avenue, Sioux Falls, SD, 57197, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">605.274.4729</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mnelson@wise.augie.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Until the mid-1990s, HIV-infected individuals typically experienced gradual disease progression and early death. Newer therapies have dramatically reversed this unrelenting progression for many people. Recipients of the newer therapies now face a new challenge: possible long-term survival. Little research has focused upon the meaning of this transition in people's lives. The purpose of this research is to describe the experience of American and Australian HIV-infected individuals who have faced the prospect of early death and then experienced dramatic improvement in their health, raising the possibility of longer term survival. Ten participants from two Midwestern sites in the United States and ten from urban New South Wales, Australia, have agreed to participate. Hermeneutic phenomenology is used to engage each participant in focussing on his/her lived experience and meanings discovered in that experience.Tapes and verbatim transcripts are reviewed by all investigators in collaboration with an expert consultant. Theme identification and interpretation is conducted iteratively by the investigators, comparing themes across participants and comparing the experiences of Australian and American participants. Collaboration among researchers and the consultant is facilitated by email, teleconferencing, and real-time discussions via NetMeeting (an internet conferencing program).</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:27:00Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:27:00Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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