2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161768
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Patterns of Antibiotic Use in Lay Populations in Honduras
Abstract:
Patterns of Antibiotic Use in Lay Populations in Honduras
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Crigger, Nancy, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Purdue University
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 1337 Johnson Hall, West Lafayette, IN, 47907-1337, USA
Contact Telephone:765.494.4001
Antibiotic resistance develops, to a large extent, from frequency of use. Almost half of the antibiotic use in the United States is inappropriate, and limited global surveillance suggests that it is significantly higher in developing countries. Although education on rational use of drugs is one of the World Health Organization's goals to reduce antibiotic use overall, limited information exists about which groups to target for education and what types of educational content would be efficacious for people in developing countries. This research describes the patterns of antibiotic use in laypersons in Honduras. A cross-sectional representative non-probability survey of 730 lay persons living in Tegucigalpa and in rural surrounding areas was conducted. Questions of Antibiotic Use (PUAS-S), an instrument about personal antibiotic use, and the Questions of Antibiotic Use-Dependent (PUAS-D), an instrument about antibiotic use in dependents, were completed in interviews by trained research assistants with study volunteers. Results indicated that urban dwellers were more likely to use antibiotics than rural residents, and that a variety of antibiotics were available. Contrary to the literature, most Hondurans in this sample sought advice from the private or public healthcare sectors or pharmacies rather than make independent medication decisions. The most common identified use for antibiotics was flu-like symptoms. The findings indicate that multiple types of antibiotics are taken concurrently and that a 1 to 3 day course of therapy is common. Findings of the study imply that educational programs may be most effective when they target city rather than rural dwellers, and healthcare providers in both the private and public sector. Education should teach proper use of antibiotics and supportive management for viral syndromes. The findings are not consistent with other Latin American population studies and this suggests that antibiotic use may be more cultural-specific than previously believed.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePatterns of Antibiotic Use in Lay Populations in Hondurasen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161768-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Patterns of Antibiotic Use in Lay Populations in Honduras</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Crigger, Nancy, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Purdue University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 1337 Johnson Hall, West Lafayette, IN, 47907-1337, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">765.494.4001</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">criggen@purdue.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Antibiotic resistance develops, to a large extent, from frequency of use. Almost half of the antibiotic use in the United States is inappropriate, and limited global surveillance suggests that it is significantly higher in developing countries. Although education on rational use of drugs is one of the World Health Organization's goals to reduce antibiotic use overall, limited information exists about which groups to target for education and what types of educational content would be efficacious for people in developing countries. This research describes the patterns of antibiotic use in laypersons in Honduras. A cross-sectional representative non-probability survey of 730 lay persons living in Tegucigalpa and in rural surrounding areas was conducted. Questions of Antibiotic Use (PUAS-S), an instrument about personal antibiotic use, and the Questions of Antibiotic Use-Dependent (PUAS-D), an instrument about antibiotic use in dependents, were completed in interviews by trained research assistants with study volunteers. Results indicated that urban dwellers were more likely to use antibiotics than rural residents, and that a variety of antibiotics were available. Contrary to the literature, most Hondurans in this sample sought advice from the private or public healthcare sectors or pharmacies rather than make independent medication decisions. The most common identified use for antibiotics was flu-like symptoms. The findings indicate that multiple types of antibiotics are taken concurrently and that a 1 to 3 day course of therapy is common. Findings of the study imply that educational programs may be most effective when they target city rather than rural dwellers, and healthcare providers in both the private and public sector. Education should teach proper use of antibiotics and supportive management for viral syndromes. The findings are not consistent with other Latin American population studies and this suggests that antibiotic use may be more cultural-specific than previously believed.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:27:03Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:27:03Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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