2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161796
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Health Hazard Evaluation: Monitoring OR Noise
Author(s):
Sions, Jacqueline A.; Beach, Myra Jo; Bowers, James; Brueck, Scott E.; Cendana, Cinthia R.; Chen, Lilia
Author Details:
Jacqueline (Jackie) A. Sions, MSN, RN, CNA, CNOR, West Virginia University Hospitals, Inc., Morgantown, West Virginia, USA, email: sionsj@wvuh.com; Myra Jo Beach, BSN, MBA, RN; James Bowers, BSN, RN, CNOR; Scott E. Brueck, MS, CIH; Cinthia R. Cendana, BSN, RN, CNOR; Lilia Chen, MS, CIH
Abstract:
Poster presented at AORN's 58th Annual Congress: Surgical staff's exposure to noise in the operating room (OR) is a health hazard. At West Virginia University Hospitals (WVUH), management was concerned with noise, especially in rooms utilizing loud surgical instruments. WVUH invited the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) to conduct a health hazard evaluation. This evaluation measured surgical staff's noise exposure by conducting 12 full-shift noise dosimetry measurements. Monitored activities included drilling, surgery preparation, and case clean-up. NIOSH also measured sound levels at different frequencies in occupied ORs. Health hazard evaluation findings indicated noise levels for employees did not exceed occupational exposure limits; sounds over 90 decibels occurred intermittently; and noise from powered surgical instruments could cause speech interference. Implications for perioperative nursing are varied. OR staff need to ensure instruments are running at the lowest possible noise level without compromising safety, select instrumentation that offers optimal decibel levels, and keep room music low. The biggest gain in noise reduction is thought to reside with drilling and sawing instrumentation. Having instrumentation vendors champion noise reduction is critical to the overall reduction in room noise. This reduction improves the environment and supports sounds that are required for patient safety.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2011
Conference Name:
AORN 58th Annual Congress
Conference Host:
Association of periOperative Registered Nurses
Conference Location:
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA
Description:
AORN 58th Annual Congress, 2011 held March 18, 2011 - March 24, 2011 in Philadelphia Convention Center
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHealth Hazard Evaluation: Monitoring OR Noiseen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSions, Jacqueline A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBeach, Myra Joen_US
dc.contributor.authorBowers, Jamesen_US
dc.contributor.authorBrueck, Scott E.en_US
dc.contributor.authorCendana, Cinthia R.en_US
dc.contributor.authorChen, Liliaen_US
dc.author.detailsJacqueline (Jackie) A. Sions, MSN, RN, CNA, CNOR, West Virginia University Hospitals, Inc., Morgantown, West Virginia, USA, email: sionsj@wvuh.com; Myra Jo Beach, BSN, MBA, RN; James Bowers, BSN, RN, CNOR; Scott E. Brueck, MS, CIH; Cinthia R. Cendana, BSN, RN, CNOR; Lilia Chen, MS, CIHen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161796-
dc.description.abstractPoster presented at AORN's 58th Annual Congress: Surgical staff's exposure to noise in the operating room (OR) is a health hazard. At West Virginia University Hospitals (WVUH), management was concerned with noise, especially in rooms utilizing loud surgical instruments. WVUH invited the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) to conduct a health hazard evaluation. This evaluation measured surgical staff's noise exposure by conducting 12 full-shift noise dosimetry measurements. Monitored activities included drilling, surgery preparation, and case clean-up. NIOSH also measured sound levels at different frequencies in occupied ORs. Health hazard evaluation findings indicated noise levels for employees did not exceed occupational exposure limits; sounds over 90 decibels occurred intermittently; and noise from powered surgical instruments could cause speech interference. Implications for perioperative nursing are varied. OR staff need to ensure instruments are running at the lowest possible noise level without compromising safety, select instrumentation that offers optimal decibel levels, and keep room music low. The biggest gain in noise reduction is thought to reside with drilling and sawing instrumentation. Having instrumentation vendors champion noise reduction is critical to the overall reduction in room noise. This reduction improves the environment and supports sounds that are required for patient safety.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T08:40:44Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T08:40:44Z-
dc.conference.date2011en_US
dc.conference.nameAORN 58th Annual Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostAssociation of periOperative Registered Nursesen_US
dc.conference.locationPhiladelphia, Pennsylvania, USAen_US
dc.descriptionAORN 58th Annual Congress, 2011 held March 18, 2011 - March 24, 2011 in Philadelphia Convention Centeren_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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