14.00
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161804
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Using a Forced-Air System to Prevent Hypothermia in Surgical Patients
Author(s):
Sobczak, Kaz
Author Details:
Kaz Sobczak, MS, RN, CNOR, UCSF Medical Center, San Francisco, California, USA, email: Kaz.Sobczak@ucsfmedctr.org
Abstract:
Poster presented at AORN's 58th Annual Congress: Purpose: The purpose of this small test of change was to examine the efficacy and efficiency of using a forced-air system to prevent hypothermia in surgical patients in clinical practice. Background: This test investigated three forced-air warming systems: upper body, lower body, and combination of upper and lower forced-air body warming blankets for existing differences in heat transfer. Setting: The operating room unit of an academic medical center, UCSF. Methods: It took place from December 2009 to January 2010. Forty-five adult patients undergoing elective surgical procedures (device A, N=14; device B, N=12; device C, N=19) were randomly assigned to one of the three different intraoperative thermal care. Results: For device A (upper and lower blanket) mean body core temperature at the end of surgery 36.7786, standard error of means 0.10802, and standard deviation 0.40417. For the device B (lower body blanket) mean body core temperature at the end of surgery 35.6895, standard error of mean 0.19070, and standard deviation 0.83126. For device C (upper body blanket) mean body core temperature at the end of surgery 35.3833, standard error of mean 0.21028, and standard deviation 0.72843. Repeated measure test ANOVA group by time was used in this study. A P value of less than 0.05 was considered to indicate a statistically significant difference. Statistically significant result based on outcome were identified between subject-effects in group 1, 2, and 3 with p=0.008. Conclusion: Device A, a combination of upper and lower warming blankets, maintained normothermia (> 36.0 degrees C) in the treated surgical patients. Device C and Device B had body core temperature approximately 1.1 degrees C below normal (36.0 degrees C). Perioperative hypothermia in Device C (35.3 degrees C) and Device B (35.6 degrees C) persisted until the end of surgery. Adding a combination of forced-air body warming blankets (Device A) to the thermal protocol significantly increased body core temperature in surgical patients. Results show the need for additional body warming methods to maintain normothermia in surgical patients.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2011
Conference Name:
AORN 58th Annual Congress
Conference Host:
Association of periOperative Registered Nurses
Conference Location:
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA
Description:
AORN 58th Annual Congress, 2011 held March 18, 2011 - March 24, 2011 in Philadelphia Convention Center
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleUsing a Forced-Air System to Prevent Hypothermia in Surgical Patientsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSobczak, Kazen_US
dc.author.detailsKaz Sobczak, MS, RN, CNOR, UCSF Medical Center, San Francisco, California, USA, email: Kaz.Sobczak@ucsfmedctr.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161804-
dc.description.abstractPoster presented at AORN's 58th Annual Congress: Purpose: The purpose of this small test of change was to examine the efficacy and efficiency of using a forced-air system to prevent hypothermia in surgical patients in clinical practice. Background: This test investigated three forced-air warming systems: upper body, lower body, and combination of upper and lower forced-air body warming blankets for existing differences in heat transfer. Setting: The operating room unit of an academic medical center, UCSF. Methods: It took place from December 2009 to January 2010. Forty-five adult patients undergoing elective surgical procedures (device A, N=14; device B, N=12; device C, N=19) were randomly assigned to one of the three different intraoperative thermal care. Results: For device A (upper and lower blanket) mean body core temperature at the end of surgery 36.7786, standard error of means 0.10802, and standard deviation 0.40417. For the device B (lower body blanket) mean body core temperature at the end of surgery 35.6895, standard error of mean 0.19070, and standard deviation 0.83126. For device C (upper body blanket) mean body core temperature at the end of surgery 35.3833, standard error of mean 0.21028, and standard deviation 0.72843. Repeated measure test ANOVA group by time was used in this study. A P value of less than 0.05 was considered to indicate a statistically significant difference. Statistically significant result based on outcome were identified between subject-effects in group 1, 2, and 3 with p=0.008. Conclusion: Device A, a combination of upper and lower warming blankets, maintained normothermia (> 36.0 degrees C) in the treated surgical patients. Device C and Device B had body core temperature approximately 1.1 degrees C below normal (36.0 degrees C). Perioperative hypothermia in Device C (35.3 degrees C) and Device B (35.6 degrees C) persisted until the end of surgery. Adding a combination of forced-air body warming blankets (Device A) to the thermal protocol significantly increased body core temperature in surgical patients. Results show the need for additional body warming methods to maintain normothermia in surgical patients.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T08:40:52Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T08:40:52Z-
dc.conference.date2011en_US
dc.conference.nameAORN 58th Annual Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostAssociation of periOperative Registered Nursesen_US
dc.conference.locationPhiladelphia, Pennsylvania, USAen_US
dc.descriptionAORN 58th Annual Congress, 2011 held March 18, 2011 - March 24, 2011 in Philadelphia Convention Centeren_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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