2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161817
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Safe and Effective Patient Positioning in Robotic Surgery
Author(s):
Sutton, Shauna J.; Brazen, Linda; Halverson-Carpenter, Katherine A.; Link, Terri D.; Flynn Makic, Mary Beth
Author Details:
Shauna J. Sutton, BSN, RN, University of Colorado Hospital, Aurora, Colorado, USA, email: shauna.sutton@uch.edu; Linda Brazen, MSN, RN, CNOR; Katherine A. Halverson-Carpenter, MBA, RN, CNOR; Terri D. Link, BSN, MPH, RN, CNOR; Mary Beth Flynn Makic, PhD, RN, CNS, CCNS, CCRN
Abstract:
Poster presented at AORN's 58th Annual Congress: The importance of accurate safe positioning that prevents slippage in steep Trendelenburg in robotic surgery is paramount and prevention of skin breakdown is equally important. There is little evidence to guide effective safe practice for positioning patients requiring robotic surgery to prevent slippage and skin breakdown. There is limited research on the use of foam for positioning in the OR or to support positioning devices for robotic surgery to prevent slippage without harm to the skin from pressure, friction, and shear forces. A multidisciplinary team was formed to evaluate two methods of positioning. Following a quality improvement model for evaluation and assessment of patient safety, the current standard of care of positioning that used an inflated air device was compared to an alternative method using high density foam. Sixty patients, 30 in each group were evaluated for time required for positioning, skin assessment, patient acuity, BMI, and other adverse outcomes, if present. Surgeon satisfaction and perception of slippage during each method of positioning was also evaluated. The results of this evaluation found the two groups to be relatively homogeneous (ASA scores 2.2; BMI average 30.5). No difference in skin breakdown was found between the two positioning methods. Time for positioning was slightly higher in the foam (average time 45.9 minutes) verses air inflation device (36 minutes). Data collected on length of time to position indicates a further need to look at these components.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2011
Conference Name:
AORN 58th Annual Congress
Conference Host:
Association of periOperative Registered Nurses
Conference Location:
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA
Description:
AORN 58th Annual Congress, 2011 held March 18, 2011 - March 24, 2011 in Philadelphia Convention Center
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSafe and Effective Patient Positioning in Robotic Surgeryen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSutton, Shauna J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBrazen, Lindaen_US
dc.contributor.authorHalverson-Carpenter, Katherine A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorLink, Terri D.en_US
dc.contributor.authorFlynn Makic, Mary Bethen_US
dc.author.detailsShauna J. Sutton, BSN, RN, University of Colorado Hospital, Aurora, Colorado, USA, email: shauna.sutton@uch.edu; Linda Brazen, MSN, RN, CNOR; Katherine A. Halverson-Carpenter, MBA, RN, CNOR; Terri D. Link, BSN, MPH, RN, CNOR; Mary Beth Flynn Makic, PhD, RN, CNS, CCNS, CCRNen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161817-
dc.description.abstractPoster presented at AORN's 58th Annual Congress: The importance of accurate safe positioning that prevents slippage in steep Trendelenburg in robotic surgery is paramount and prevention of skin breakdown is equally important. There is little evidence to guide effective safe practice for positioning patients requiring robotic surgery to prevent slippage and skin breakdown. There is limited research on the use of foam for positioning in the OR or to support positioning devices for robotic surgery to prevent slippage without harm to the skin from pressure, friction, and shear forces. A multidisciplinary team was formed to evaluate two methods of positioning. Following a quality improvement model for evaluation and assessment of patient safety, the current standard of care of positioning that used an inflated air device was compared to an alternative method using high density foam. Sixty patients, 30 in each group were evaluated for time required for positioning, skin assessment, patient acuity, BMI, and other adverse outcomes, if present. Surgeon satisfaction and perception of slippage during each method of positioning was also evaluated. The results of this evaluation found the two groups to be relatively homogeneous (ASA scores 2.2; BMI average 30.5). No difference in skin breakdown was found between the two positioning methods. Time for positioning was slightly higher in the foam (average time 45.9 minutes) verses air inflation device (36 minutes). Data collected on length of time to position indicates a further need to look at these components.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T08:41:07Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T08:41:07Z-
dc.conference.date2011en_US
dc.conference.nameAORN 58th Annual Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostAssociation of periOperative Registered Nursesen_US
dc.conference.locationPhiladelphia, Pennsylvania, USAen_US
dc.descriptionAORN 58th Annual Congress, 2011 held March 18, 2011 - March 24, 2011 in Philadelphia Convention Centeren_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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