2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161828
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Noise Awareness Campaign in the Operating Room
Author(s):
Valdez, Christine; Silen, Rita
Author Details:
Christine R. Valdez, MN/CNS-BC, RN, CNOR, US Department of Veteran Affairs, Portland VA Medical Center, Portland, Oregon, USA; Rita Silen, BSN, CRNA
Abstract:
Poster presented at AORN's 58th Annual Congress: In 1995, the World Health Organization (WHO) established guidelines for noise levels in hospitals followed by a detailed report and recommendations. WHO guidelines recommend that noise levels should not exceed 40 decibels during the day; WHO does not have specific guidelines for noise levels in the operating room (OR). Noise pollution is a contributing factor to ambient stressors and distraction for clinical staff and patients. Description of the Team: Perioperative Team Preparation and Planning: A sound level meter (SLM) microphone was located close to the anesthesia provider so that noise levels in the OR suite relevant to nursing, anesthesia, and surgical staff present in the setting could be measured. Assessment: In addition, increasingly complex surgical procedures on more critically ill patients necessitate more personnel in the ORs, additional equipment, and precise communication among providers. Implementation: The objectives of this study are: 1. To measure and compare sound levels (in decibels) in OR suites, 2. Determine the different sources of noise in each OR with a view, and 3. Determine whether noise levels are potentially intrusive to function in the ORs. Outcomes: For general surgery cases, the average decibel levels (LAeq) were between 55 and 75. The peak decibel levels (Lcpk) were between 80 and 110. Concurrent cases showed more noise generation. Implication for Perioperative Nursing: Induction and emergence from anesthesia proved to be noisier times in the room. Resulting escalating noise within this critical care setting may be exceeding recommended decibel limits, thereby compromising critical thinking, communication, and vigilance.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2011
Conference Name:
AORN 58th Annual Congress
Conference Host:
Association of periOperative Registered Nurses
Conference Location:
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA
Description:
AORN 58th Annual Congress, 2011 held March 18, 2011 - March 24, 2011 in Philadelphia Convention Center
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNoise Awareness Campaign in the Operating Roomen_GB
dc.contributor.authorValdez, Christineen_US
dc.contributor.authorSilen, Ritaen_US
dc.author.detailsChristine R. Valdez, MN/CNS-BC, RN, CNOR, US Department of Veteran Affairs, Portland VA Medical Center, Portland, Oregon, USA; Rita Silen, BSN, CRNAen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161828-
dc.description.abstractPoster presented at AORN's 58th Annual Congress: In 1995, the World Health Organization (WHO) established guidelines for noise levels in hospitals followed by a detailed report and recommendations. WHO guidelines recommend that noise levels should not exceed 40 decibels during the day; WHO does not have specific guidelines for noise levels in the operating room (OR). Noise pollution is a contributing factor to ambient stressors and distraction for clinical staff and patients. Description of the Team: Perioperative Team Preparation and Planning: A sound level meter (SLM) microphone was located close to the anesthesia provider so that noise levels in the OR suite relevant to nursing, anesthesia, and surgical staff present in the setting could be measured. Assessment: In addition, increasingly complex surgical procedures on more critically ill patients necessitate more personnel in the ORs, additional equipment, and precise communication among providers. Implementation: The objectives of this study are: 1. To measure and compare sound levels (in decibels) in OR suites, 2. Determine the different sources of noise in each OR with a view, and 3. Determine whether noise levels are potentially intrusive to function in the ORs. Outcomes: For general surgery cases, the average decibel levels (LAeq) were between 55 and 75. The peak decibel levels (Lcpk) were between 80 and 110. Concurrent cases showed more noise generation. Implication for Perioperative Nursing: Induction and emergence from anesthesia proved to be noisier times in the room. Resulting escalating noise within this critical care setting may be exceeding recommended decibel limits, thereby compromising critical thinking, communication, and vigilance.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T08:41:18Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T08:41:18Z-
dc.conference.date2011en_US
dc.conference.nameAORN 58th Annual Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostAssociation of periOperative Registered Nursesen_US
dc.conference.locationPhiladelphia, Pennsylvania, USAen_US
dc.descriptionAORN 58th Annual Congress, 2011 held March 18, 2011 - March 24, 2011 in Philadelphia Convention Centeren_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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