2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161884
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Evidence-Based Practices for Preventing Corneal Abrasions
Author(s):
Lopez, Olga T.; Hughes, Jane E.
Author Details:
Olga T. Lopez, BSN, RN, CNOR, NorthWest Hospital, Randallstown, Maryland, USA, email: olopez@lifebridgehealth.org; Jane E. Hughes, BSN, RN
Abstract:
Poster presented at AORN's 58th Annual Congress: Purpose: What is the best evidence based practice to develop and implement an effective plan to prevent corneal abrasions during the perioperative process? Methodology: A computerized evidence based literature review and expert opinions were utilized to obtain information for this project. Results: Based on the literature review, there is an increase in surgical corneal abrasions occurring as rapidly as surgical technology progresses. Corneal abrasions may occur for a multitude of reasons in the perioperative setting. Among these included 20% due to direct eye trauma or chemical injury and 80% due to lagophthalmos. Some authors have reported an increase of 44% in corneal abrasions during general anesthesia while others have claimed an increase due to patient positioning. Many areas of practice needed to be examined to determine the best preventive methods of practice. Perioperative Nursing Implications: The results indicated an imperative need for improvement in perioperative nursing practice. Prevention of corneal abrasions is the responsibility of the entire perioperative team, including nursing, anesthesia, and surgical providers. A plan which developed into a policy/procedure was incorporated throughout surgical services. This included all areas: preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative. Removal of all eye and facial make-up, distancing objects which could cause direct trauma, proper taping techniques, proper positioning, use of safety equipment, and pharmaceutical products were utilized in the new policy/procedure. Through extensive educational programs, the best evidenced based practices were examined and put into effect. Through clinical process improvement, a new plan for patient eye safety has been adopted and shows to be continually successful.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2011
Conference Name:
AORN 58th Annual Congress
Conference Host:
Association of periOperative Registered Nurses
Conference Location:
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA
Description:
AORN 58th Annual Congress, 2011 held March 18, 2011 - March 24, 2011 in Philadelphia Convention Center
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEvidence-Based Practices for Preventing Corneal Abrasionsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorLopez, Olga T.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHughes, Jane E.en_US
dc.author.detailsOlga T. Lopez, BSN, RN, CNOR, NorthWest Hospital, Randallstown, Maryland, USA, email: olopez@lifebridgehealth.org; Jane E. Hughes, BSN, RNen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161884-
dc.description.abstractPoster presented at AORN's 58th Annual Congress: Purpose: What is the best evidence based practice to develop and implement an effective plan to prevent corneal abrasions during the perioperative process? Methodology: A computerized evidence based literature review and expert opinions were utilized to obtain information for this project. Results: Based on the literature review, there is an increase in surgical corneal abrasions occurring as rapidly as surgical technology progresses. Corneal abrasions may occur for a multitude of reasons in the perioperative setting. Among these included 20% due to direct eye trauma or chemical injury and 80% due to lagophthalmos. Some authors have reported an increase of 44% in corneal abrasions during general anesthesia while others have claimed an increase due to patient positioning. Many areas of practice needed to be examined to determine the best preventive methods of practice. Perioperative Nursing Implications: The results indicated an imperative need for improvement in perioperative nursing practice. Prevention of corneal abrasions is the responsibility of the entire perioperative team, including nursing, anesthesia, and surgical providers. A plan which developed into a policy/procedure was incorporated throughout surgical services. This included all areas: preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative. Removal of all eye and facial make-up, distancing objects which could cause direct trauma, proper taping techniques, proper positioning, use of safety equipment, and pharmaceutical products were utilized in the new policy/procedure. Through extensive educational programs, the best evidenced based practices were examined and put into effect. Through clinical process improvement, a new plan for patient eye safety has been adopted and shows to be continually successful.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T08:42:14Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T08:42:14Z-
dc.conference.date2011en_US
dc.conference.nameAORN 58th Annual Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostAssociation of periOperative Registered Nursesen_US
dc.conference.locationPhiladelphia, Pennsylvania, USAen_US
dc.descriptionAORN 58th Annual Congress, 2011 held March 18, 2011 - March 24, 2011 in Philadelphia Convention Centeren_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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