2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161889
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Effect of Forced-Air Warming on Perioperative Hypothermia
Author(s):
Magpantay, Glenda; Ciotta, Jill; Johnson, Karen; Kavanagh, Eileen; Mielke, Amanda
Author Details:
Glenda Magpantay, BSN, RN, CNOR, University of Maryland Medical Systems, Baltimore, Maryland, USA, email: gmagpantay@umm.edu; Jill Ciotta, BSN, RN, CNOR; Karen Johnson, PhD, RN; Eileen Kavanagh, RN; Amanda Mielke, BSN, RN, CNOR, CRNFA
Abstract:
Poster presented at AORN's 58th Annual Congress: Surgical Care Improvement Project (SCIP) designates perioperative temperature management as one of 2010 national priorities. While the Joint Commission sets the median rate of preventing hypothermia at 91%, normothermia is not achieved by passive warming using cotton blankets. The purpose of this evidence-based project is to answer the question: In perioperative patients, what is the effect of forced-air warming on perioperative hypothermia, patient satisfaction, and cost compared with warm cotton blankets? Ten sources of evidence were reviewed according to level and quality using the Johns Hopkins Model for Evidence-based Practice. Six studies showed level II A while four studies showed level IV A. Results of the studies revealed that the use of forced-air warming was more effective than the use of warm cotton blankets in preventing hypothermia. The use of forced-air warming maintains core temperature, prevents hypothermia, enhances comfort, and restores normothermia in the PACU faster. A pilot pre-warming protocol was designed on 30 same day surgery patients undergoing colorectal surgery. The use of forced-air warming device was initiated in the preoperative area. Temperatures are taken at the following intervals; blanket application, prior to transport to OR, upon induction of anesthesia, and within 15 minutes of arrival to PACU. Patient satisfaction survey was filled out by the patients and cost savings analysis was done. The pre-warming protocol on the use of forced air warming device is now being implemented as a practice change at the University of Maryland Medical Systems perioperative services.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2011
Conference Name:
AORN 58th Annual Congress
Conference Host:
Association of periOperative Registered Nurses
Conference Location:
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA
Description:
AORN 58th Annual Congress, 2011 held March 18, 2011 - March 24, 2011 in Philadelphia Convention Center
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEffect of Forced-Air Warming on Perioperative Hypothermiaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMagpantay, Glendaen_US
dc.contributor.authorCiotta, Jillen_US
dc.contributor.authorJohnson, Karenen_US
dc.contributor.authorKavanagh, Eileenen_US
dc.contributor.authorMielke, Amandaen_US
dc.author.detailsGlenda Magpantay, BSN, RN, CNOR, University of Maryland Medical Systems, Baltimore, Maryland, USA, email: gmagpantay@umm.edu; Jill Ciotta, BSN, RN, CNOR; Karen Johnson, PhD, RN; Eileen Kavanagh, RN; Amanda Mielke, BSN, RN, CNOR, CRNFAen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161889-
dc.description.abstractPoster presented at AORN's 58th Annual Congress: Surgical Care Improvement Project (SCIP) designates perioperative temperature management as one of 2010 national priorities. While the Joint Commission sets the median rate of preventing hypothermia at 91%, normothermia is not achieved by passive warming using cotton blankets. The purpose of this evidence-based project is to answer the question: In perioperative patients, what is the effect of forced-air warming on perioperative hypothermia, patient satisfaction, and cost compared with warm cotton blankets? Ten sources of evidence were reviewed according to level and quality using the Johns Hopkins Model for Evidence-based Practice. Six studies showed level II A while four studies showed level IV A. Results of the studies revealed that the use of forced-air warming was more effective than the use of warm cotton blankets in preventing hypothermia. The use of forced-air warming maintains core temperature, prevents hypothermia, enhances comfort, and restores normothermia in the PACU faster. A pilot pre-warming protocol was designed on 30 same day surgery patients undergoing colorectal surgery. The use of forced-air warming device was initiated in the preoperative area. Temperatures are taken at the following intervals; blanket application, prior to transport to OR, upon induction of anesthesia, and within 15 minutes of arrival to PACU. Patient satisfaction survey was filled out by the patients and cost savings analysis was done. The pre-warming protocol on the use of forced air warming device is now being implemented as a practice change at the University of Maryland Medical Systems perioperative services.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T08:42:19Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T08:42:19Z-
dc.conference.date2011en_US
dc.conference.nameAORN 58th Annual Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostAssociation of periOperative Registered Nursesen_US
dc.conference.locationPhiladelphia, Pennsylvania, USAen_US
dc.descriptionAORN 58th Annual Congress, 2011 held March 18, 2011 - March 24, 2011 in Philadelphia Convention Centeren_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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