2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161891
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Laser Fire Time-Out
Author(s):
Mananquil, Ronda F.; Garcia, Ian; Magat, Maria
Author Details:
Ronda F. Mananquil, BSN, RN, CNOR, Kaiser Medical Center, South San Francisco, California, USA; Ian Garcia, RN; Maria Magat, RN
Abstract:
Poster presented at AORN's 58th Annual Congress: The hazards of fire during laryngeal laser surgery are well documented in literature. For the past two years, our operating room has incorporated a Laser Fire Time-Out in the head and neck service. A Laser Fire Time-Out provides better communication for the entire operating room team. Aside from the initial time-out or briefing, our laser nurse asks everyone in the room to pause for a laser fire time out, prior to using the laser. It is important to do the Laser Fire Time-Out just before using the laser; the timing ensures that the personnel in the room will be present when the laser is fired. The team, which consists of the surgeon, anesthesia provider, the circulating nurse, the laser nurse, and the scrub personnel, will identify each ones role in the event of a fire. This discussion takes into account, the type of surgery, equipment involved, location of fire, and method of extinguishing the fire. Based on these variables, appropriate interventions are assigned to each team member, which will provide the most efficient care for the patient. In the event of a laryngeal fire, seconds count, quick action by the OR team can reduce the severity of the injury. Laser Fire Time-Outs can prevent confusion and panic and can instill confidence and competency in a dangerous situation.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2011
Conference Name:
AORN 58th Annual Congress
Conference Host:
Association of periOperative Registered Nurses
Conference Location:
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA
Description:
AORN 58th Annual Congress, 2011 held March 18, 2011 - March 24, 2011 in Philadelphia Convention Center
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleLaser Fire Time-Outen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMananquil, Ronda F.en_US
dc.contributor.authorGarcia, Ianen_US
dc.contributor.authorMagat, Mariaen_US
dc.author.detailsRonda F. Mananquil, BSN, RN, CNOR, Kaiser Medical Center, South San Francisco, California, USA; Ian Garcia, RN; Maria Magat, RNen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161891-
dc.description.abstractPoster presented at AORN's 58th Annual Congress: The hazards of fire during laryngeal laser surgery are well documented in literature. For the past two years, our operating room has incorporated a Laser Fire Time-Out in the head and neck service. A Laser Fire Time-Out provides better communication for the entire operating room team. Aside from the initial time-out or briefing, our laser nurse asks everyone in the room to pause for a laser fire time out, prior to using the laser. It is important to do the Laser Fire Time-Out just before using the laser; the timing ensures that the personnel in the room will be present when the laser is fired. The team, which consists of the surgeon, anesthesia provider, the circulating nurse, the laser nurse, and the scrub personnel, will identify each ones role in the event of a fire. This discussion takes into account, the type of surgery, equipment involved, location of fire, and method of extinguishing the fire. Based on these variables, appropriate interventions are assigned to each team member, which will provide the most efficient care for the patient. In the event of a laryngeal fire, seconds count, quick action by the OR team can reduce the severity of the injury. Laser Fire Time-Outs can prevent confusion and panic and can instill confidence and competency in a dangerous situation.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T08:42:20Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T08:42:20Z-
dc.conference.date2011en_US
dc.conference.nameAORN 58th Annual Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostAssociation of periOperative Registered Nursesen_US
dc.conference.locationPhiladelphia, Pennsylvania, USAen_US
dc.descriptionAORN 58th Annual Congress, 2011 held March 18, 2011 - March 24, 2011 in Philadelphia Convention Centeren_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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