Hot Topic: The Silent Treatment- Why Safety Tools and Checklists Aren't Enough to Save Lives

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161898
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Hot Topic: The Silent Treatment- Why Safety Tools and Checklists Aren't Enough to Save Lives
Author(s):
Maxfield, David
Author Details:
David Maxfield, BA, Director of Research, VitalSmarts, Provo, Utah, USA, email: mwilson@vitalsmarts.com
Abstract:
Abstract presented at AORN's 58th Annual Congress: Poor communication is deadly, especially in perioperative and critical care settings. When communication breaks down in intensive care units and operating rooms, the result is catastrophic harm and even death. The Silent Treatment, a new study conducted by VitalSmarts, the American Association of Critical Care Nurses, and the Association of periOperative Registered Nurses, examines an especially dangerous kind of communication breakdown: risks that are known but not discussed... "undiscussables." Using results from the groundbreaking study, David Maxfield will examine the calculated decisions health care professionals make daily to not speak up. The Silent Treatment shows how the failure to raise concerns when risks are known undermines the effectiveness of current safety tools. This session will focus on three specific concerns that often result in a decision to not speak up: dangerous short cuts, incompetence, and disrespect. David will also unveil the frequency and impact of these communication breakdowns and review the actions individuals and organizations can take to resolve them.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2011
Conference Name:
AORN 58th Annual Congress
Conference Host:
Association of periOperative Registered Nurses
Conference Location:
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA
Description:
AORN 58th Annual Congress, 2011 held March 18, 2011 - March 24, 2011 in Philadelphia Convention Center
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHot Topic: The Silent Treatment- Why Safety Tools and Checklists Aren't Enough to Save Livesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMaxfield, Daviden_US
dc.author.detailsDavid Maxfield, BA, Director of Research, VitalSmarts, Provo, Utah, USA, email: mwilson@vitalsmarts.comen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161898-
dc.description.abstractAbstract presented at AORN's 58th Annual Congress: Poor communication is deadly, especially in perioperative and critical care settings. When communication breaks down in intensive care units and operating rooms, the result is catastrophic harm and even death. The Silent Treatment, a new study conducted by VitalSmarts, the American Association of Critical Care Nurses, and the Association of periOperative Registered Nurses, examines an especially dangerous kind of communication breakdown: risks that are known but not discussed... "undiscussables." Using results from the groundbreaking study, David Maxfield will examine the calculated decisions health care professionals make daily to not speak up. The Silent Treatment shows how the failure to raise concerns when risks are known undermines the effectiveness of current safety tools. This session will focus on three specific concerns that often result in a decision to not speak up: dangerous short cuts, incompetence, and disrespect. David will also unveil the frequency and impact of these communication breakdowns and review the actions individuals and organizations can take to resolve them.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T08:42:27Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T08:42:27Z-
dc.conference.date2011en_US
dc.conference.nameAORN 58th Annual Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostAssociation of periOperative Registered Nursesen_US
dc.conference.locationPhiladelphia, Pennsylvania, USAen_US
dc.descriptionAORN 58th Annual Congress, 2011 held March 18, 2011 - March 24, 2011 in Philadelphia Convention Centeren_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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