2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161905
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Checklist Briefings and Team Attitudes
Author(s):
McDowell, Diana S.
Author Details:
Diana S. McDowell, MSN, RN, CNOR, Purdue University, Indianapolis, Indiana, USA, email: dsmcdowell@clariannorth.com
Abstract:
Poster presented at AORN's 58th Annual Congress: Purpose: The purpose of this systematic review was to evaluate the evidence regarding professional attitudes of surgical team members toward team briefings structured by a surgical safety checklist. Methodology: A broad search of the PubMed data base was conducted to attain all research articles published from 1980 to 2010 related to checklist briefings performed prior to surgical procedures. Quasi-experimental studies were included and must have measured surgical team members' attitudes toward the use and perceived efficacy of checklist briefings. MeSH Terms included combinations of surgical procedures, operative, safety, and checklist. Results: Of the initial 89 articles retrieved, only three contained studies on surgical team members attitudes toward checklist briefings. Results suggested agreement that checklist briefings allowed teams to identify and solve issues, and increase error prevention. There was moderate agreement regarding the improvement of surgical teamwork, and moderate to little agreement that briefings led to additional information being shared or increased educational opportunities. Only one study addressed the overall worth of the checklist briefing (81% positive responses). Perioperative Nursing Implications: Attitudes toward a new intervention can influence its success or failure and compliance rates can be compromised if it is perceived to be ineffective, inconvenient, or a burden to workflow. Team members may also be reluctant to enforce the steps of a checklist briefing if their colleagues are perceived to be negative or disinterested. With the increase of checklist briefings in surgical suites worldwide, further study of team members attitudes may help predict the supports and barriers to the success of this safety intervention.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2011
Conference Name:
AORN 58th Annual Congress
Conference Host:
Association of periOperative Registered Nurses
Conference Location:
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA
Description:
AORN 58th Annual Congress, 2011 held March 18, 2011 - March 24, 2011 in Philadelphia Convention Center
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleChecklist Briefings and Team Attitudesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMcDowell, Diana S.en_US
dc.author.detailsDiana S. McDowell, MSN, RN, CNOR, Purdue University, Indianapolis, Indiana, USA, email: dsmcdowell@clariannorth.comen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161905-
dc.description.abstractPoster presented at AORN's 58th Annual Congress: Purpose: The purpose of this systematic review was to evaluate the evidence regarding professional attitudes of surgical team members toward team briefings structured by a surgical safety checklist. Methodology: A broad search of the PubMed data base was conducted to attain all research articles published from 1980 to 2010 related to checklist briefings performed prior to surgical procedures. Quasi-experimental studies were included and must have measured surgical team members' attitudes toward the use and perceived efficacy of checklist briefings. MeSH Terms included combinations of surgical procedures, operative, safety, and checklist. Results: Of the initial 89 articles retrieved, only three contained studies on surgical team members attitudes toward checklist briefings. Results suggested agreement that checklist briefings allowed teams to identify and solve issues, and increase error prevention. There was moderate agreement regarding the improvement of surgical teamwork, and moderate to little agreement that briefings led to additional information being shared or increased educational opportunities. Only one study addressed the overall worth of the checklist briefing (81% positive responses). Perioperative Nursing Implications: Attitudes toward a new intervention can influence its success or failure and compliance rates can be compromised if it is perceived to be ineffective, inconvenient, or a burden to workflow. Team members may also be reluctant to enforce the steps of a checklist briefing if their colleagues are perceived to be negative or disinterested. With the increase of checklist briefings in surgical suites worldwide, further study of team members attitudes may help predict the supports and barriers to the success of this safety intervention.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T08:42:34Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T08:42:34Z-
dc.conference.date2011en_US
dc.conference.nameAORN 58th Annual Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostAssociation of periOperative Registered Nursesen_US
dc.conference.locationPhiladelphia, Pennsylvania, USAen_US
dc.descriptionAORN 58th Annual Congress, 2011 held March 18, 2011 - March 24, 2011 in Philadelphia Convention Centeren_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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