2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161910
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Effectiveness of Evidence-Based Surgical Gloving
Author(s):
Kim, Kyung Mi
Author Details:
Kyung Mi Kim, MS, RN, St. Mary Medical Center, Langhorne, Pennsylvania, USA, email: kyungmi79@hotmail.com
Abstract:
Poster presented at AORN's 58th Annual Congress: Purpose: The purpose of this study is to investigate current additional surgical gloving protection aimed at preventing micro-perforations in surgical gloves. Methodology: 585 innermost pairs of surgical gloves were collected in an academic medical center in San Francisco. Gloves were subjected to a watertight test to reveal otherwise undetected micro-perforations. Additionally, 144 pairs of an orthopedic surgical teams triple gloving combinations that include cloth gloves, colored indicator gloves, special orthopedics gloves, and powered and non-powered gloves were tested for micro-perforations. Results: 87% of surgical team members practice the double gloving, while 13% practice single gloving. The undetected micro-perforation rate in the innermost pairs of surgical gloves was 2% and 3%, respectively. It approximately four times lower than the reported rate in the literature, which was ranged from 8% to 50%. The undetected micro-perforation rate using triple gloving combinations that included special orthopedic gloves as innermost pairs was 0%. Perioperative Nursing Implications: Double gloving with either colored perforation indicator gloves or special orthopedics gloves is an inexpensive practice reducing the micro perforation rate in the innermost pair of surgical gloves. Results of this study may provide perioperative nurses a guide in their usage of surgical gloving protection while not yet establishing a standardized additional glove protection method. Limitation of this study was other possible contributing factors were not controlled, such as the seniority and subsequent experience of the glove wearers. Further study is needed to evaluate the relationship between clinically visible glove perforation and the occurrence of SSIs.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2011
Conference Name:
AORN 58th Annual Congress
Conference Host:
Association of periOperative Registered Nurses
Conference Location:
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA
Description:
AORN 58th Annual Congress, 2011 held March 18, 2011 - March 24, 2011 in Philadelphia Convention Center
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Effectiveness of Evidence-Based Surgical Glovingen_GB
dc.contributor.authorKim, Kyung Mien_US
dc.author.detailsKyung Mi Kim, MS, RN, St. Mary Medical Center, Langhorne, Pennsylvania, USA, email: kyungmi79@hotmail.comen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161910-
dc.description.abstractPoster presented at AORN's 58th Annual Congress: Purpose: The purpose of this study is to investigate current additional surgical gloving protection aimed at preventing micro-perforations in surgical gloves. Methodology: 585 innermost pairs of surgical gloves were collected in an academic medical center in San Francisco. Gloves were subjected to a watertight test to reveal otherwise undetected micro-perforations. Additionally, 144 pairs of an orthopedic surgical teams triple gloving combinations that include cloth gloves, colored indicator gloves, special orthopedics gloves, and powered and non-powered gloves were tested for micro-perforations. Results: 87% of surgical team members practice the double gloving, while 13% practice single gloving. The undetected micro-perforation rate in the innermost pairs of surgical gloves was 2% and 3%, respectively. It approximately four times lower than the reported rate in the literature, which was ranged from 8% to 50%. The undetected micro-perforation rate using triple gloving combinations that included special orthopedic gloves as innermost pairs was 0%. Perioperative Nursing Implications: Double gloving with either colored perforation indicator gloves or special orthopedics gloves is an inexpensive practice reducing the micro perforation rate in the innermost pair of surgical gloves. Results of this study may provide perioperative nurses a guide in their usage of surgical gloving protection while not yet establishing a standardized additional glove protection method. Limitation of this study was other possible contributing factors were not controlled, such as the seniority and subsequent experience of the glove wearers. Further study is needed to evaluate the relationship between clinically visible glove perforation and the occurrence of SSIs.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T08:42:39Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T08:42:39Z-
dc.conference.date2011en_US
dc.conference.nameAORN 58th Annual Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostAssociation of periOperative Registered Nursesen_US
dc.conference.locationPhiladelphia, Pennsylvania, USAen_US
dc.descriptionAORN 58th Annual Congress, 2011 held March 18, 2011 - March 24, 2011 in Philadelphia Convention Centeren_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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