2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161912
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Flashing Must GO to Make Our Infection Rate LOW!
Author(s):
Milligan, Kelly A.
Author Details:
Kelly A. Milligan, RN, CNOR, Aria Health, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, email: kamilligan@ariahealth.org
Abstract:
Poster presented at AORN's 58th Annual Congress: In 2002, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported that about two million patients got nosocomial infections; 90,000 of these patients developed a significant untoward outcome. A significant or untoward event could be death or permanent injury resulting from these infections is a sentinel event, which is then reported to the Joint Commmision. Therefore, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Joint Commission have heightened the awareness of the need for action plans, process evaluations, and data analysis related to flash sterilizations within organizations. Our focus with this process is to evaluate and decrease the flash sterilization percentage rate within our organization. Our operating room (OR) steering committee consists of surgeons, directors, managers, charge nurses, educator, infection prevention nurse, and a sterile processing manager. One of our strategies to decrease our infection rate was to further drill down our process for flash sterilization in our ORs. We decided as a group to review all the flash logs quarterly. Kelly Milligan was delegated to collect, interpret, and report out the data from the flash logs and flash sterilizers in all ORs. We currently are in the assessment needs phase of our plan. Implementation measures are slowly being incorporated into our plan, such as educating the staff on flash sterilization and buying instrumentation that are utilized consecutively for one particular surgeon or procedure. We hope our outcomes will show a decrease in our flash sterilization percentage rate. If our processes and data collection prove to decrease our overall flash rate, we can acurately prove that we are moving toward decreasing our patients postoperative infection rates.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2011
Conference Name:
AORN 58th Annual Congress
Conference Host:
Association of periOperative Registered Nurses
Conference Location:
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA
Description:
AORN 58th Annual Congress, 2011 held March 18, 2011 - March 24, 2011 in Philadelphia Convention Center
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFlashing Must GO to Make Our Infection Rate LOW!en_GB
dc.contributor.authorMilligan, Kelly A.en_US
dc.author.detailsKelly A. Milligan, RN, CNOR, Aria Health, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, email: kamilligan@ariahealth.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161912-
dc.description.abstractPoster presented at AORN's 58th Annual Congress: In 2002, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported that about two million patients got nosocomial infections; 90,000 of these patients developed a significant untoward outcome. A significant or untoward event could be death or permanent injury resulting from these infections is a sentinel event, which is then reported to the Joint Commmision. Therefore, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Joint Commission have heightened the awareness of the need for action plans, process evaluations, and data analysis related to flash sterilizations within organizations. Our focus with this process is to evaluate and decrease the flash sterilization percentage rate within our organization. Our operating room (OR) steering committee consists of surgeons, directors, managers, charge nurses, educator, infection prevention nurse, and a sterile processing manager. One of our strategies to decrease our infection rate was to further drill down our process for flash sterilization in our ORs. We decided as a group to review all the flash logs quarterly. Kelly Milligan was delegated to collect, interpret, and report out the data from the flash logs and flash sterilizers in all ORs. We currently are in the assessment needs phase of our plan. Implementation measures are slowly being incorporated into our plan, such as educating the staff on flash sterilization and buying instrumentation that are utilized consecutively for one particular surgeon or procedure. We hope our outcomes will show a decrease in our flash sterilization percentage rate. If our processes and data collection prove to decrease our overall flash rate, we can acurately prove that we are moving toward decreasing our patients postoperative infection rates.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T08:42:40Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T08:42:40Z-
dc.conference.date2011en_US
dc.conference.nameAORN 58th Annual Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostAssociation of periOperative Registered Nursesen_US
dc.conference.locationPhiladelphia, Pennsylvania, USAen_US
dc.descriptionAORN 58th Annual Congress, 2011 held March 18, 2011 - March 24, 2011 in Philadelphia Convention Centeren_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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