2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161914
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Decreasing Intraoperative Acquired Finger Neuropathies
Author(s):
Mitzel, Anita I.; Appling, Susan E.; MacDonald, Ryan; McBeth, Maureen; Sardi, Armando
Author Details:
Anita I. Mitzel, BSN, RN, CNOR, Mercy Medical Center, Baltimore, Maryland, USA, email: amitzel@mdmercy.com; Susan E. Appling; Ryan MacDonald, MD; Maureen McBeth, MS; Armando Sardi, MD
Abstract:
Poster presented at AORN's 58th Annual Congress: Patients undergoing cytoreductive surgery/hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy are vulnerable to upper extremety peripheral neurapathy due to prolonged surgical time and positioning. An evidence-based non-randomized intervention study was conducted. Could an intraoperative positioning intervention improve the incidence of postoperative finger paresthesias? During an 18 month period, 50 consecutive patients were studied. The initial 25 patients received routine intraoperative positioning (control group). The final 25 patients (intervention group) received an intraoperative intervention that included upper extremity repositioning, limiting abduction and extension, limiting pressure, and selective padding. The two groups were compared on outcome variables, including the development of postoperative paresthesias, distritution, and duration. Data were also collected on gender, age, diagnosis, body mass index, preoperative neurological or muscle impairment, peripheral vascular disease, peripheral neuropathy, previous chemotherapy, immunosuppression, diabetes, smoking history, nutritional deficit, hypertension, operating room (OR) time, arterial-line position, and chemotherapy agent used. The intervention group was 50% less likely than the control group to develop postoperative paresthesias, although this reduction in risk not statistically significant (p=0.265). Other variables that were significantly associated with the development of postoperative paresthesias were OR time and the presence of neurological impairment and hypertension. Specifically, for each additional hour of OR time, there was a 30% increased odds of developing a peripheral neuropathy. The presence of neurological impairment and hypertension were associated with a statistically significant increase in postoperative paresthesias (p=0.022: p=0.029 respectively). A comprehensive intraoperative intervention for upper extremety positioning and padding holds promise to decrease the incidence of postoperative paresthesias. A prospective randomized trial with more patients is needed to clearly define the intervention.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2011
Conference Name:
AORN 58th Annual Congress
Conference Host:
Association of periOperative Registered Nurses
Conference Location:
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA
Description:
AORN 58th Annual Congress, 2011 held March 18, 2011 - March 24, 2011 in Philadelphia Convention Center
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDecreasing Intraoperative Acquired Finger Neuropathiesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMitzel, Anita I.en_US
dc.contributor.authorAppling, Susan E.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMacDonald, Ryanen_US
dc.contributor.authorMcBeth, Maureenen_US
dc.contributor.authorSardi, Armandoen_US
dc.author.detailsAnita I. Mitzel, BSN, RN, CNOR, Mercy Medical Center, Baltimore, Maryland, USA, email: amitzel@mdmercy.com; Susan E. Appling; Ryan MacDonald, MD; Maureen McBeth, MS; Armando Sardi, MDen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161914-
dc.description.abstractPoster presented at AORN's 58th Annual Congress: Patients undergoing cytoreductive surgery/hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy are vulnerable to upper extremety peripheral neurapathy due to prolonged surgical time and positioning. An evidence-based non-randomized intervention study was conducted. Could an intraoperative positioning intervention improve the incidence of postoperative finger paresthesias? During an 18 month period, 50 consecutive patients were studied. The initial 25 patients received routine intraoperative positioning (control group). The final 25 patients (intervention group) received an intraoperative intervention that included upper extremity repositioning, limiting abduction and extension, limiting pressure, and selective padding. The two groups were compared on outcome variables, including the development of postoperative paresthesias, distritution, and duration. Data were also collected on gender, age, diagnosis, body mass index, preoperative neurological or muscle impairment, peripheral vascular disease, peripheral neuropathy, previous chemotherapy, immunosuppression, diabetes, smoking history, nutritional deficit, hypertension, operating room (OR) time, arterial-line position, and chemotherapy agent used. The intervention group was 50% less likely than the control group to develop postoperative paresthesias, although this reduction in risk not statistically significant (p=0.265). Other variables that were significantly associated with the development of postoperative paresthesias were OR time and the presence of neurological impairment and hypertension. Specifically, for each additional hour of OR time, there was a 30% increased odds of developing a peripheral neuropathy. The presence of neurological impairment and hypertension were associated with a statistically significant increase in postoperative paresthesias (p=0.022: p=0.029 respectively). A comprehensive intraoperative intervention for upper extremety positioning and padding holds promise to decrease the incidence of postoperative paresthesias. A prospective randomized trial with more patients is needed to clearly define the intervention.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T08:42:42Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T08:42:42Z-
dc.conference.date2011en_US
dc.conference.nameAORN 58th Annual Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostAssociation of periOperative Registered Nursesen_US
dc.conference.locationPhiladelphia, Pennsylvania, USAen_US
dc.descriptionAORN 58th Annual Congress, 2011 held March 18, 2011 - March 24, 2011 in Philadelphia Convention Centeren_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.