2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161919
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Aseptic Technique in Afghanistan
Author(s):
Myers, Sandra L.
Author Details:
LCDR Sandra L. Myers NC, USN, MSN, RN, CNOR, US Navy, Portsmouth, Virginia, USA, email: slmyers66@yahoo.com
Abstract:
Poster presented at AORN's 58th Annual Congress: Maintaining aseptic technique in Afghanistan is difficult due to environmental conditions of fine dust and debris contaminating the surgical field. Storage shelves, as well as sterile packaging, can be coated in layers of dust. A storage system of open wood shelving and open basins was in place upon our team's arrival in Afghanistan. Sterile supplies opened for the first surgical procedure our Forward Surgical Team conducted had layers of dust on the outside packaging. The wooden shelves were difficult to clean and the open basins collected dust. The perioperative nurse began brainstorming methods to reduce the amount of contaminants in the operating room and Sterile Processing Department. A decision was made to install a system of shelf paper, shower curtains, sealed plastic bins, and plastic basin covers. Preparation and planning included acquiring necessary supplies, such as shower curtains, shelf paper, and plastic bins. Wooden shelving was thoroughly cleaned with disinfectant and a layer of shelf paper was applied to the clean surface. Sterile peel packed instruments were place either in sealable plastic bins or basins covered with plastic liners. Plastic shower curtains were placed over wooden shelving units. The outcome was reduced bioburden on sterile packaging and shelving units. Shelving units were easier to keep clean and the shower curtain covering prevented inadvertent bioburden splatter from trauma cases. Future surgical team deployments could utilize a system of barrier protection of sterile items for improved aseptic technique and reduction of contamination in open wounds. The views expressed in this article are those of those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of the Department of the Navy, Department of Defense, or the United States Government. I am a military service member. This work was prepared as part of my official duties. Title 17 U.S.C. 105 provides that Copyright protection under this title is not available for any work of the United States Government. Title 17 U.S.C. 101 defines a United States Government work as a work prepared by a military service member or employee of the United States Government as part of that persons official duties.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2011
Conference Name:
AORN 58th Annual Congress
Conference Host:
Association of periOperative Registered Nurses
Conference Location:
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA
Description:
AORN 58th Annual Congress, 2011 held March 18, 2011 - March 24, 2011 in Philadelphia Convention Center
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAseptic Technique in Afghanistanen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMyers, Sandra L.en_US
dc.author.detailsLCDR Sandra L. Myers NC, USN, MSN, RN, CNOR, US Navy, Portsmouth, Virginia, USA, email: slmyers66@yahoo.comen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161919-
dc.description.abstractPoster presented at AORN's 58th Annual Congress: Maintaining aseptic technique in Afghanistan is difficult due to environmental conditions of fine dust and debris contaminating the surgical field. Storage shelves, as well as sterile packaging, can be coated in layers of dust. A storage system of open wood shelving and open basins was in place upon our team's arrival in Afghanistan. Sterile supplies opened for the first surgical procedure our Forward Surgical Team conducted had layers of dust on the outside packaging. The wooden shelves were difficult to clean and the open basins collected dust. The perioperative nurse began brainstorming methods to reduce the amount of contaminants in the operating room and Sterile Processing Department. A decision was made to install a system of shelf paper, shower curtains, sealed plastic bins, and plastic basin covers. Preparation and planning included acquiring necessary supplies, such as shower curtains, shelf paper, and plastic bins. Wooden shelving was thoroughly cleaned with disinfectant and a layer of shelf paper was applied to the clean surface. Sterile peel packed instruments were place either in sealable plastic bins or basins covered with plastic liners. Plastic shower curtains were placed over wooden shelving units. The outcome was reduced bioburden on sterile packaging and shelving units. Shelving units were easier to keep clean and the shower curtain covering prevented inadvertent bioburden splatter from trauma cases. Future surgical team deployments could utilize a system of barrier protection of sterile items for improved aseptic technique and reduction of contamination in open wounds. The views expressed in this article are those of those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of the Department of the Navy, Department of Defense, or the United States Government. I am a military service member. This work was prepared as part of my official duties. Title 17 U.S.C. 105 provides that Copyright protection under this title is not available for any work of the United States Government. Title 17 U.S.C. 101 defines a United States Government work as a work prepared by a military service member or employee of the United States Government as part of that persons official duties.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T08:42:48Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T08:42:48Z-
dc.conference.date2011en_US
dc.conference.nameAORN 58th Annual Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostAssociation of periOperative Registered Nursesen_US
dc.conference.locationPhiladelphia, Pennsylvania, USAen_US
dc.descriptionAORN 58th Annual Congress, 2011 held March 18, 2011 - March 24, 2011 in Philadelphia Convention Centeren_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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