2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161927
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Reduce Prescription Errors in the Medication Process
Author(s):
Nuntawinit, Chutatip; Wongtrakul, Saichol
Author Details:
Chutatip Nuntawinit, PhD, RN, Siriraj Hospital, Bangkok-noi, Thailand, email: getortho@yahoo.com; Saichol Wongtrakul, MD
Abstract:
Poster presented at AORN's 58th Annual Congress: Purpose: Prescription errors are common in many settings, especially in orthopedic surgery. Description of Team: The team consisted of all physicians, perioperative nurses, and nurses who work in outpatient and inpatient units of orthopedic surgery. Assessment: All prescription orders were reviewed by pharmacists. Most medication errors occurred during physician ordering; there were about 2,200 errors per year. Preparation and Planning: The clinical lead team (CLT) did the gap analysis between desired stage and actual stage. Then we did the root cause analysis of the medication problems and proposed a variety tools when prescribing medications. Implementation: The CLT proposed a variety tools when prescribing medications: 1. Promote physicians to complete all essential data fields in prescription order with legible handwriting, 2. Provide reminder poster about frequent drug interactions and a recommendation for abbreviation use, 3. Label using red stickers in all prescription forms for allergy alerts so that potential adverse drug events that would otherwise go unrecognized can easily be avoided, 4. Allow nurses to assess and verify the medication orders appropriateness, 5. Empower all patients to involve and communicate about any medication concerns and their conditions with physicians, and 6. Remind all physicians who did the prescription errors to comply with the recommendations. Outcome: The pharmacists identified 2,162; 1,507; and 1,494 prescription errors in 2007, 2008, and 2009 respectively. Implications for Perioperative Nursing: This project provided health care practitioners with techniques to reduce the occurrence of prescribing errors and to increase compliance with recommended prescribing regimen.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2011
Conference Name:
AORN 58th Annual Congress
Conference Host:
Association of periOperative Registered Nurses
Conference Location:
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA
Description:
AORN 58th Annual Congress, 2011 held March 18, 2011 - March 24, 2011 in Philadelphia Convention Center
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleReduce Prescription Errors in the Medication Processen_GB
dc.contributor.authorNuntawinit, Chutatipen_US
dc.contributor.authorWongtrakul, Saicholen_US
dc.author.detailsChutatip Nuntawinit, PhD, RN, Siriraj Hospital, Bangkok-noi, Thailand, email: getortho@yahoo.com; Saichol Wongtrakul, MDen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161927-
dc.description.abstractPoster presented at AORN's 58th Annual Congress: Purpose: Prescription errors are common in many settings, especially in orthopedic surgery. Description of Team: The team consisted of all physicians, perioperative nurses, and nurses who work in outpatient and inpatient units of orthopedic surgery. Assessment: All prescription orders were reviewed by pharmacists. Most medication errors occurred during physician ordering; there were about 2,200 errors per year. Preparation and Planning: The clinical lead team (CLT) did the gap analysis between desired stage and actual stage. Then we did the root cause analysis of the medication problems and proposed a variety tools when prescribing medications. Implementation: The CLT proposed a variety tools when prescribing medications: 1. Promote physicians to complete all essential data fields in prescription order with legible handwriting, 2. Provide reminder poster about frequent drug interactions and a recommendation for abbreviation use, 3. Label using red stickers in all prescription forms for allergy alerts so that potential adverse drug events that would otherwise go unrecognized can easily be avoided, 4. Allow nurses to assess and verify the medication orders appropriateness, 5. Empower all patients to involve and communicate about any medication concerns and their conditions with physicians, and 6. Remind all physicians who did the prescription errors to comply with the recommendations. Outcome: The pharmacists identified 2,162; 1,507; and 1,494 prescription errors in 2007, 2008, and 2009 respectively. Implications for Perioperative Nursing: This project provided health care practitioners with techniques to reduce the occurrence of prescribing errors and to increase compliance with recommended prescribing regimen.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T08:42:55Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T08:42:55Z-
dc.conference.date2011en_US
dc.conference.nameAORN 58th Annual Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostAssociation of periOperative Registered Nursesen_US
dc.conference.locationPhiladelphia, Pennsylvania, USAen_US
dc.descriptionAORN 58th Annual Congress, 2011 held March 18, 2011 - March 24, 2011 in Philadelphia Convention Centeren_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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