2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161934
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Correlation of Skin Injuries with Surgical Positioning
Author(s):
Palazzo, Soraya
Author Details:
Soraya Palazzo, MS, RN, Centro Universitario, Sao Camilo, Brazil, email: enfcentrocirurgico@saocamilo-sp.br
Abstract:
Poster presented at AORN's 58th Annual Congress: The surgical center (SC) is one of the most complex units in the hospital, and has the main purpose of offering resources that provide safety during the administration of anesthesia and surgical procedures. The medical and nursing teams require adequate technical conditions to provide for the needs of their patients during the preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative periods. Positioning the patient for surgery is a key factor in performing procedures in a safe and efficient manner. The main objective of proper positioning is to promote excellent exposure of the surgical site and, at the same time, prevent complications that may arise from the surgical positioning. The objective of this study was to correlate surgical positioning in patients who have pre-existent risk factors to developing skin lesions during the operatory process. This study is a retrospective field research with a quantitative approach, approved by the Research Ethics Committee of the Sao Camilo University Center [Centro Universitßrio Sao Camilo]. We analyzed 1,149 medical records for the risk of skin lesions due to surgical positioning during the operative period. The study covered the surgical activities in the surgical department of a private hospital in Spo Paulo in the timeframe of June 2008 to June 2010. The data analyzed in these medical records were: gender; pre-existing lesions; name of the procedure/surgery performed; lesion during the surgery and 24 hours after the procedure was performed if there was regression, worsening of the lesion, and if the lesion remained the same or was not evaluated. The results obtained from the records analysis showed that females had more pre-existing risk factors than males, 53% in females and 47% in males. During this timeframe, the most common surgeries performed for both genders were general surgery and orthopedic surgery. Among the medical records analyzed, only 186 patients acquired lesions during the surgical process. Of these, 117 were in females and 69 in males, which demonstrated a positive margin of records without lesions in the post-operatory phase, totaling 80.8% in the females and 87.2% in the males. This demonstrates that the care provided in the surgical operating room was efficient and performed in a safe manner. Of the 186 records with postoperative lesions, 137 regressed within 24 hours, seven got worse, 15 were unaltered, and 27 were not evaluated as the patients were discharged from the hospital before 24 hours had transpired. It is the nurse's responsibility, in addition to providing nursing care, to insure the safety of the patients in the surgical room by providing safe positioning, planning, programming, and evaluating interventions to maintain the integrity of the skin.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2011
Conference Name:
AORN 58th Annual Congress
Conference Host:
Association of periOperative Registered Nurses
Conference Location:
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA
Description:
AORN 58th Annual Congress, 2011 held March 18, 2011 - March 24, 2011 in Philadelphia Convention Center
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCorrelation of Skin Injuries with Surgical Positioningen_GB
dc.contributor.authorPalazzo, Sorayaen_US
dc.author.detailsSoraya Palazzo, MS, RN, Centro Universitario, Sao Camilo, Brazil, email: enfcentrocirurgico@saocamilo-sp.bren_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161934-
dc.description.abstractPoster presented at AORN's 58th Annual Congress: The surgical center (SC) is one of the most complex units in the hospital, and has the main purpose of offering resources that provide safety during the administration of anesthesia and surgical procedures. The medical and nursing teams require adequate technical conditions to provide for the needs of their patients during the preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative periods. Positioning the patient for surgery is a key factor in performing procedures in a safe and efficient manner. The main objective of proper positioning is to promote excellent exposure of the surgical site and, at the same time, prevent complications that may arise from the surgical positioning. The objective of this study was to correlate surgical positioning in patients who have pre-existent risk factors to developing skin lesions during the operatory process. This study is a retrospective field research with a quantitative approach, approved by the Research Ethics Committee of the Sao Camilo University Center [Centro Universitßrio Sao Camilo]. We analyzed 1,149 medical records for the risk of skin lesions due to surgical positioning during the operative period. The study covered the surgical activities in the surgical department of a private hospital in Spo Paulo in the timeframe of June 2008 to June 2010. The data analyzed in these medical records were: gender; pre-existing lesions; name of the procedure/surgery performed; lesion during the surgery and 24 hours after the procedure was performed if there was regression, worsening of the lesion, and if the lesion remained the same or was not evaluated. The results obtained from the records analysis showed that females had more pre-existing risk factors than males, 53% in females and 47% in males. During this timeframe, the most common surgeries performed for both genders were general surgery and orthopedic surgery. Among the medical records analyzed, only 186 patients acquired lesions during the surgical process. Of these, 117 were in females and 69 in males, which demonstrated a positive margin of records without lesions in the post-operatory phase, totaling 80.8% in the females and 87.2% in the males. This demonstrates that the care provided in the surgical operating room was efficient and performed in a safe manner. Of the 186 records with postoperative lesions, 137 regressed within 24 hours, seven got worse, 15 were unaltered, and 27 were not evaluated as the patients were discharged from the hospital before 24 hours had transpired. It is the nurse's responsibility, in addition to providing nursing care, to insure the safety of the patients in the surgical room by providing safe positioning, planning, programming, and evaluating interventions to maintain the integrity of the skin.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T08:43:02Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T08:43:02Z-
dc.conference.date2011en_US
dc.conference.nameAORN 58th Annual Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostAssociation of periOperative Registered Nursesen_US
dc.conference.locationPhiladelphia, Pennsylvania, USAen_US
dc.descriptionAORN 58th Annual Congress, 2011 held March 18, 2011 - March 24, 2011 in Philadelphia Convention Centeren_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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