2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161948
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Role of Positioning Devices on Pressure Ulcers
Author(s):
Primiano, Michael; McNett, Molly
Author Details:
Michael Primiano, BSN, BA, RN, CNOR, Metrohealth Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio, USA, email: mprimiano@metrohealth.org; Molly McNett, PhD, RN
Abstract:
Poster presented at AORN's 58th Annual Congress: Purpose of Project: Pressure ulcer formation related to positioning in the operating room increases length of stay and hospital costs. There is little evidence documenting how positioning devices used in the operating room influence pressure ulcer development when examined with traditional risk factors. Research Aim: Identify prevalence of and risk factors associated with pressure ulcer development in the operating room among patients undergoing surgical procedures longer than three hours. Methodology: A conceptual model was created using intrinsic and extrinsic factors associated with pressure ulcers. Outcome Variable: Development of new pressure ulcer. Design: Prospective cohort study. Subjects: All adult same day admit patients scheduled for a three hour long surgical procedure during an eight month period. Procedures: Data gathered pre-operatively, intraoperatively, and post-operatively on pressure ulcer risk factors. Results: n=258. 73% of patients between age 46 and 75. Most surgeries lasted three to five hours (63%). Bivariate analyses indicate that type of positioning (heels elevated) (x2 27.897, p=.048), table surface (foam table pad) (x2 2 15.848, p=0.000), PACU skin assessment (x2=41.652, p=.000), and gender (male) (x2=6.984, p=.030) were associated with PU development. Logistic regression analyses indicate use of foam pad (B=2.691, p=.024) and day one Braden score (B=.244, p=.003) were predictive of pressure ulcers. Limitations: Single site, data only gathered on prolonged surgeries. Implications: Findings contribute information about factors associated with skin breakdown in the operating room among surgical cases lasting longer than three hours. Routine use of heel elevation and foam pads in prolonged surgical cases should be re-examined to establish best practice recommendations.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2011
Conference Name:
AORN 58th Annual Congress
Conference Host:
Association of periOperative Registered Nurses
Conference Location:
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA
Description:
AORN 58th Annual Congress, 2011 held March 18, 2011 - March 24, 2011 in Philadelphia Convention Center
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Role of Positioning Devices on Pressure Ulcersen_GB
dc.contributor.authorPrimiano, Michaelen_US
dc.contributor.authorMcNett, Mollyen_US
dc.author.detailsMichael Primiano, BSN, BA, RN, CNOR, Metrohealth Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio, USA, email: mprimiano@metrohealth.org; Molly McNett, PhD, RNen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161948-
dc.description.abstractPoster presented at AORN's 58th Annual Congress: Purpose of Project: Pressure ulcer formation related to positioning in the operating room increases length of stay and hospital costs. There is little evidence documenting how positioning devices used in the operating room influence pressure ulcer development when examined with traditional risk factors. Research Aim: Identify prevalence of and risk factors associated with pressure ulcer development in the operating room among patients undergoing surgical procedures longer than three hours. Methodology: A conceptual model was created using intrinsic and extrinsic factors associated with pressure ulcers. Outcome Variable: Development of new pressure ulcer. Design: Prospective cohort study. Subjects: All adult same day admit patients scheduled for a three hour long surgical procedure during an eight month period. Procedures: Data gathered pre-operatively, intraoperatively, and post-operatively on pressure ulcer risk factors. Results: n=258. 73% of patients between age 46 and 75. Most surgeries lasted three to five hours (63%). Bivariate analyses indicate that type of positioning (heels elevated) (x2 27.897, p=.048), table surface (foam table pad) (x2 2 15.848, p=0.000), PACU skin assessment (x2=41.652, p=.000), and gender (male) (x2=6.984, p=.030) were associated with PU development. Logistic regression analyses indicate use of foam pad (B=2.691, p=.024) and day one Braden score (B=.244, p=.003) were predictive of pressure ulcers. Limitations: Single site, data only gathered on prolonged surgeries. Implications: Findings contribute information about factors associated with skin breakdown in the operating room among surgical cases lasting longer than three hours. Routine use of heel elevation and foam pads in prolonged surgical cases should be re-examined to establish best practice recommendations.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T08:43:16Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T08:43:16Z-
dc.conference.date2011en_US
dc.conference.nameAORN 58th Annual Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostAssociation of periOperative Registered Nursesen_US
dc.conference.locationPhiladelphia, Pennsylvania, USAen_US
dc.descriptionAORN 58th Annual Congress, 2011 held March 18, 2011 - March 24, 2011 in Philadelphia Convention Centeren_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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