2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161952
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Experience of Living with Surgical Site Infections
Author(s):
Rihn, Cheryl Ann
Author Details:
Cheryl Ann Rihn, RN, MSN, CNOR, Sacred Heart Hospital, Eau Claire, Wisconsin, USA, email: crihn@shec.hshs.org
Abstract:
Poster presented at AORN's 58th Annual Congress: Purpose: To explore the patient experience of having a Surgical Site Infection (SSI). It aims to identify the perceived emotional, physical, and financial stressors that patients may experience during and after their treatment for an SSI. Method: A qualitative interpretive phenomenological design was used as the basis of this study. The qualitative approach examined the effects an SSI has on patients through personal subjective data. The phenomenological approach relied on examining people's life experiences and significance that having an SSI played in their lives. The interpretive studies differentiated between the similarities and differences in the life experiences of the participants. Results: Physical effects (pain, ability to resume daily activities, mobility, and dependece upon others), financial effect (ability to pay expenses not covered by insurance or Medicare, loss of income related to time off from work for treatment), and emotional effects (anger, frustration, fear, uncertainty) were all evident in all of the participants for this study. Limitations to this study were SSI treatment more than a year ago, small sample size, locations of SSIs (leg, belly, and chest region), and pre-existing co-morbidities were not taken into account. Perioperative Nurse Implications: Prevention of SSIs is first and foremost the most important step that perioperative nurses can take to insure that their patients don't contract an SSI that could have potential life altering effects. Identifying potential factors preceding an SSI, such as staffing practices, prep solutions, instrument turnover and flashing, and room cleaning practices can assist the perioperative nurse with working to correct these causative factors and prevent future SSIs.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2011
Conference Name:
AORN 58th Annual Congress
Conference Host:
Association of periOperative Registered Nurses
Conference Location:
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA
Description:
AORN 58th Annual Congress, 2011 held March 18, 2011 - March 24, 2011 in Philadelphia Convention Center
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Experience of Living with Surgical Site Infectionsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorRihn, Cheryl Annen_US
dc.author.detailsCheryl Ann Rihn, RN, MSN, CNOR, Sacred Heart Hospital, Eau Claire, Wisconsin, USA, email: crihn@shec.hshs.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161952-
dc.description.abstractPoster presented at AORN's 58th Annual Congress: Purpose: To explore the patient experience of having a Surgical Site Infection (SSI). It aims to identify the perceived emotional, physical, and financial stressors that patients may experience during and after their treatment for an SSI. Method: A qualitative interpretive phenomenological design was used as the basis of this study. The qualitative approach examined the effects an SSI has on patients through personal subjective data. The phenomenological approach relied on examining people's life experiences and significance that having an SSI played in their lives. The interpretive studies differentiated between the similarities and differences in the life experiences of the participants. Results: Physical effects (pain, ability to resume daily activities, mobility, and dependece upon others), financial effect (ability to pay expenses not covered by insurance or Medicare, loss of income related to time off from work for treatment), and emotional effects (anger, frustration, fear, uncertainty) were all evident in all of the participants for this study. Limitations to this study were SSI treatment more than a year ago, small sample size, locations of SSIs (leg, belly, and chest region), and pre-existing co-morbidities were not taken into account. Perioperative Nurse Implications: Prevention of SSIs is first and foremost the most important step that perioperative nurses can take to insure that their patients don't contract an SSI that could have potential life altering effects. Identifying potential factors preceding an SSI, such as staffing practices, prep solutions, instrument turnover and flashing, and room cleaning practices can assist the perioperative nurse with working to correct these causative factors and prevent future SSIs.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T08:43:20Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T08:43:20Z-
dc.conference.date2011en_US
dc.conference.nameAORN 58th Annual Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostAssociation of periOperative Registered Nursesen_US
dc.conference.locationPhiladelphia, Pennsylvania, USAen_US
dc.descriptionAORN 58th Annual Congress, 2011 held March 18, 2011 - March 24, 2011 in Philadelphia Convention Centeren_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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