2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161956
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
High Fidelity Simulation in Malignant Hyperthermia Management
Author(s):
Roach, Kimberly D.; Bartlett, Lillian C.; Burnes, Michelle A.
Author Details:
Kimberly D. Roach, BSN, RN, OCN, Indiana University Health-Bloomington, Indianapolis, Indiana, USA, email: kroach@bloomingtonhospital.org; Lillian C. Bartlett, BSN, RN, CNOR; Michelle A. Burnes, BSN, RN
Abstract:
Poster presented at AORN's 58th Annual Congress: Clinical Issue: Malignant Hyperthermia (MH) is a rare genetic condition. The patient is exposed to anesthetic gas and a depolarizing muscle relaxant resulting in a surgical emergency defined as MH. Staff education within the hospital's high risk areas consist of webcast participation, self-study packet, and return demonstration of mixing medications. This type of education fails to address staff response and protocol implementation. Description of Team: Clinical educator, staff nurse, simulation specialist, anesthesiologist, surgical services, and post anesthesia care team (OR Team) participated in the simulated exercise. Preparation and Planning: High Fidelity Simulation (HFS) is being utilized in health care education to assess competency, increase knowledge acquisition, and strengthen skill demonstration. HFS was used to educate the OR on MH to fulfill the yearly educational requirement. Clinical educator and simulation specialist developed a MH case based scenario and corresponding in-situ simulation utilizing a human patient simulator (HPS). The key objectives were defined and a structured debriefing was developed using the hospital MH policy as a framework. HFS occurred over four educational meetings prior to start of work day. Assessment: To comply with governing body standards, OR nurses, anesthesiologists, and certified surgical technicians, must undergo competency assessment in MH recognition and management. These have included webcasts, self-study packets, and return demonstrations. These modalities do not assess the staffs reaction or institutional process to an actual MH emergency. HFS provides an opportunity to assess staff competency and intuitional processes. Implementation: OR staff participated in a HFS demonstrating signs and symptoms of malignant hyperthermia during anesthetic emergence. The participants initiated and completed care based on the symptomatology, EKG readings and laboratory results. Key objectives were recorded and timed to assess current MH protocol adherence and implementation. The HFS exercise was conducted in an OR suite as part of scheduled education meetings. A structured debriefing provided opportunity to ask questions regarding MH protocol and process. Practice changes noted in debriefing were discussed with OR director. Outcome: Following implementation of the HFS exercises, OR staff identified process changes regarding multidisciplinary interactions, after-hours management, equipment, and team member roles. Debriefing themes included departmental expansion of HFS participation, proposed MH policy changes, and praise regarding HFS. Practice changes and policy adjustments regarding cooling measures and medication availability were implemented. Implications for Nursing: Participation in an in-situ HFS exercise, OR staff experience an MH crisis and react according to MH protocol providing an avenue to verify institutional process. HFS provides the opportunity to suggest process improvement and identify personal competence regarding skills. Successful establishment of baseline organizational ability to manage an MH Crisis provides avenue for change to improve patient outcomes.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2011
Conference Name:
AORN 58th Annual Congress
Conference Host:
Association of periOperative Registered Nurses
Conference Location:
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA
Description:
AORN 58th Annual Congress, 2011 held March 18, 2011 - March 24, 2011 in Philadelphia Convention Center
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHigh Fidelity Simulation in Malignant Hyperthermia Managementen_GB
dc.contributor.authorRoach, Kimberly D.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBartlett, Lillian C.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBurnes, Michelle A.en_US
dc.author.detailsKimberly D. Roach, BSN, RN, OCN, Indiana University Health-Bloomington, Indianapolis, Indiana, USA, email: kroach@bloomingtonhospital.org; Lillian C. Bartlett, BSN, RN, CNOR; Michelle A. Burnes, BSN, RNen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161956-
dc.description.abstractPoster presented at AORN's 58th Annual Congress: Clinical Issue: Malignant Hyperthermia (MH) is a rare genetic condition. The patient is exposed to anesthetic gas and a depolarizing muscle relaxant resulting in a surgical emergency defined as MH. Staff education within the hospital's high risk areas consist of webcast participation, self-study packet, and return demonstration of mixing medications. This type of education fails to address staff response and protocol implementation. Description of Team: Clinical educator, staff nurse, simulation specialist, anesthesiologist, surgical services, and post anesthesia care team (OR Team) participated in the simulated exercise. Preparation and Planning: High Fidelity Simulation (HFS) is being utilized in health care education to assess competency, increase knowledge acquisition, and strengthen skill demonstration. HFS was used to educate the OR on MH to fulfill the yearly educational requirement. Clinical educator and simulation specialist developed a MH case based scenario and corresponding in-situ simulation utilizing a human patient simulator (HPS). The key objectives were defined and a structured debriefing was developed using the hospital MH policy as a framework. HFS occurred over four educational meetings prior to start of work day. Assessment: To comply with governing body standards, OR nurses, anesthesiologists, and certified surgical technicians, must undergo competency assessment in MH recognition and management. These have included webcasts, self-study packets, and return demonstrations. These modalities do not assess the staffs reaction or institutional process to an actual MH emergency. HFS provides an opportunity to assess staff competency and intuitional processes. Implementation: OR staff participated in a HFS demonstrating signs and symptoms of malignant hyperthermia during anesthetic emergence. The participants initiated and completed care based on the symptomatology, EKG readings and laboratory results. Key objectives were recorded and timed to assess current MH protocol adherence and implementation. The HFS exercise was conducted in an OR suite as part of scheduled education meetings. A structured debriefing provided opportunity to ask questions regarding MH protocol and process. Practice changes noted in debriefing were discussed with OR director. Outcome: Following implementation of the HFS exercises, OR staff identified process changes regarding multidisciplinary interactions, after-hours management, equipment, and team member roles. Debriefing themes included departmental expansion of HFS participation, proposed MH policy changes, and praise regarding HFS. Practice changes and policy adjustments regarding cooling measures and medication availability were implemented. Implications for Nursing: Participation in an in-situ HFS exercise, OR staff experience an MH crisis and react according to MH protocol providing an avenue to verify institutional process. HFS provides the opportunity to suggest process improvement and identify personal competence regarding skills. Successful establishment of baseline organizational ability to manage an MH Crisis provides avenue for change to improve patient outcomes.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T08:43:23Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T08:43:23Z-
dc.conference.date2011en_US
dc.conference.nameAORN 58th Annual Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostAssociation of periOperative Registered Nursesen_US
dc.conference.locationPhiladelphia, Pennsylvania, USAen_US
dc.descriptionAORN 58th Annual Congress, 2011 held March 18, 2011 - March 24, 2011 in Philadelphia Convention Centeren_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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