2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161980
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Transapical Aortic Valve Implantation
Author(s):
Arroyo, D. Jacqueline
Author Details:
D. Jacqueline Arroyo, RN, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA, email: darroyo@partners.org
Abstract:
Poster presented at AORN's 58th Annual Congress: Transapical aortic valve implantation is a minimally invasive procedure. Even though the procedure is minimally invasive, caution must still be taken to prevent any mishaps. Most patients that have this procedure are older patients who cannot withstand any other type of aortic valve implantation. Severe narrowing of the aortic valve is the main reason for the transapical aortic valve implantation. When this procedure is performed, preparation is extremely important. The procedure generally requires a team consisting of anesthetists, cardiac surgeons, cardiologists, and perioperative nurses. They all must work together to ensure the best outcome for the patient. Prior to the procedure, the team must go through disciplined training to learn the different steps of the procedure. It is also recommended that the team view an actual transapical aortic valve implementation performed by an experienced team. Once this is done, the team should perform an actual implantation under the supervision of an experienced team. The team should actually perform several of these procedures while under supervision until it is determined by the experts that they have become skilled and work together perfectly as a team. The procedure should be performed in a hybrid operating room with excellent imaging equipment. If this is not possible, a converted cardiac catheterization room is acceptable. Because the majority of patients having this procedure are elderly, detailed preoperative examinations are a must. These examinations are also considered part of the team preparation. All patients should have cardiac catheterization in order to determine if there are any pressing issues with the arteries. A lung function analysis should also be performed before the procedure and a transthoracic echo is necessary in order to find out if there are any other valve issues. All of these preoperative examinations are imperative and help the team determine whether or not the procedure should be performed or not. As with any other type of surgery, whether considered minimally invasive or major surgery, complications can arise. Under the supervision of the physician, the nurse will be responsible for most of the perioperative care of the patient. As a result, the nurse must be aware of any and all complications that may arise and must also know how to assist the patient with treatment and management of these medical issues. There are numerous other complications that may arise following this procedure and it is important to know that this type of surgery, as with any other type of surgery, is not foolproof. However, the success rate can be relatively high if the surgical team performing the operation and the nurse providing the postoperative care are both highly trained. It is also important that the patient follow the instructions after discharge to ensure that the recuperation period is speedy and without complications.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2011
Conference Name:
AORN 58th Annual Congress
Conference Host:
Association of periOperative Registered Nurses
Conference Location:
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA
Description:
AORN 58th Annual Congress, 2011 held March 18, 2011 - March 24, 2011 in Philadelphia Convention Center
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTransapical Aortic Valve Implantationen_GB
dc.contributor.authorArroyo, D. Jacquelineen_US
dc.author.detailsD. Jacqueline Arroyo, RN, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA, email: darroyo@partners.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161980-
dc.description.abstractPoster presented at AORN's 58th Annual Congress: Transapical aortic valve implantation is a minimally invasive procedure. Even though the procedure is minimally invasive, caution must still be taken to prevent any mishaps. Most patients that have this procedure are older patients who cannot withstand any other type of aortic valve implantation. Severe narrowing of the aortic valve is the main reason for the transapical aortic valve implantation. When this procedure is performed, preparation is extremely important. The procedure generally requires a team consisting of anesthetists, cardiac surgeons, cardiologists, and perioperative nurses. They all must work together to ensure the best outcome for the patient. Prior to the procedure, the team must go through disciplined training to learn the different steps of the procedure. It is also recommended that the team view an actual transapical aortic valve implementation performed by an experienced team. Once this is done, the team should perform an actual implantation under the supervision of an experienced team. The team should actually perform several of these procedures while under supervision until it is determined by the experts that they have become skilled and work together perfectly as a team. The procedure should be performed in a hybrid operating room with excellent imaging equipment. If this is not possible, a converted cardiac catheterization room is acceptable. Because the majority of patients having this procedure are elderly, detailed preoperative examinations are a must. These examinations are also considered part of the team preparation. All patients should have cardiac catheterization in order to determine if there are any pressing issues with the arteries. A lung function analysis should also be performed before the procedure and a transthoracic echo is necessary in order to find out if there are any other valve issues. All of these preoperative examinations are imperative and help the team determine whether or not the procedure should be performed or not. As with any other type of surgery, whether considered minimally invasive or major surgery, complications can arise. Under the supervision of the physician, the nurse will be responsible for most of the perioperative care of the patient. As a result, the nurse must be aware of any and all complications that may arise and must also know how to assist the patient with treatment and management of these medical issues. There are numerous other complications that may arise following this procedure and it is important to know that this type of surgery, as with any other type of surgery, is not foolproof. However, the success rate can be relatively high if the surgical team performing the operation and the nurse providing the postoperative care are both highly trained. It is also important that the patient follow the instructions after discharge to ensure that the recuperation period is speedy and without complications.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T08:43:47Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T08:43:47Z-
dc.conference.date2011en_US
dc.conference.nameAORN 58th Annual Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostAssociation of periOperative Registered Nursesen_US
dc.conference.locationPhiladelphia, Pennsylvania, USAen_US
dc.descriptionAORN 58th Annual Congress, 2011 held March 18, 2011 - March 24, 2011 in Philadelphia Convention Centeren_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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