Evaluating A Radio Frequency Identification Sponge Counting System as an Adjunct to Manual Surgical Counts

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161986
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Evaluating A Radio Frequency Identification Sponge Counting System as an Adjunct to Manual Surgical Counts
Author(s):
Baird, M.V.; Brents, Michelle J.
Author Details:
M.V. "Ginny" Baird, BSN, RN, CNOR, The Methodist Hospital, Houston, Texas, USA, email: GBaird@tmhs.org; Michelle J. Brents, MS, RN, CNOR
Abstract:
Poster presented at AORN's 58th Annual Congress: According to AORN, surgical counts are performed to account for all items and to lessen the potential for injury to the patient as a result of a retained foreign body (RFB) (Recommended Practices, 2008). The 2010 Recommended Practices (RPs) state that newly developed adjunct technology available should be implemented to coincide with manual counting of surgical sponges. According to Gawande, 28.4 million procedures were performed in 1999 with over 1,500 of the cases having a confirmed RFB (2003) and it was noted that approximately two-thirds of the cases were sponge-related. A surgical count might be incorrectly reported as correct following two or more manual counts. ECRI reported that roughly 75% incidents for RFB were related to erroneously reported correct counts. This study involves use of a commercially available technology that is Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved for use in counting and recording the number of radio-frequency identification (RFID) tagged surgical sponges and towels used during open procedures and examines nurse and surgeon perceptions of new count technology in conjunction with manual count processes. The technology provides a non-invasive means of locating retained RFID-tagged surgical items within the surgical environment. The study should result in zero incidences of retained sponges. Further, the staff perceptions should show that the physicians and nurses feel added confidence that the sponge counts are correct. The study should also demonstrate opportunities to efficiently resolve inaccurate counts. The study may provoke the undesired effect of minimizing reliance on manual counts.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2011
Conference Name:
AORN 58th Annual Congress
Conference Host:
Association of periOperative Registered Nurses
Conference Location:
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA
Description:
AORN 58th Annual Congress, 2011 held March 18, 2011 - March 24, 2011 in Philadelphia Convention Center
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEvaluating A Radio Frequency Identification Sponge Counting System as an Adjunct to Manual Surgical Countsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBaird, M.V.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBrents, Michelle J.en_US
dc.author.detailsM.V. "Ginny" Baird, BSN, RN, CNOR, The Methodist Hospital, Houston, Texas, USA, email: GBaird@tmhs.org; Michelle J. Brents, MS, RN, CNORen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161986-
dc.description.abstractPoster presented at AORN's 58th Annual Congress: According to AORN, surgical counts are performed to account for all items and to lessen the potential for injury to the patient as a result of a retained foreign body (RFB) (Recommended Practices, 2008). The 2010 Recommended Practices (RPs) state that newly developed adjunct technology available should be implemented to coincide with manual counting of surgical sponges. According to Gawande, 28.4 million procedures were performed in 1999 with over 1,500 of the cases having a confirmed RFB (2003) and it was noted that approximately two-thirds of the cases were sponge-related. A surgical count might be incorrectly reported as correct following two or more manual counts. ECRI reported that roughly 75% incidents for RFB were related to erroneously reported correct counts. This study involves use of a commercially available technology that is Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved for use in counting and recording the number of radio-frequency identification (RFID) tagged surgical sponges and towels used during open procedures and examines nurse and surgeon perceptions of new count technology in conjunction with manual count processes. The technology provides a non-invasive means of locating retained RFID-tagged surgical items within the surgical environment. The study should result in zero incidences of retained sponges. Further, the staff perceptions should show that the physicians and nurses feel added confidence that the sponge counts are correct. The study should also demonstrate opportunities to efficiently resolve inaccurate counts. The study may provoke the undesired effect of minimizing reliance on manual counts.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T08:43:52Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T08:43:52Z-
dc.conference.date2011en_US
dc.conference.nameAORN 58th Annual Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostAssociation of periOperative Registered Nursesen_US
dc.conference.locationPhiladelphia, Pennsylvania, USAen_US
dc.descriptionAORN 58th Annual Congress, 2011 held March 18, 2011 - March 24, 2011 in Philadelphia Convention Centeren_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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