2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161988
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Shunt Infection Eradication: A State of Mind
Author(s):
Bangud, Cyril; Gaid, Lufel; Quion, Scherry D.; Tagaytayan, Raniel O.
Author Details:
Cyril C. Bangud, BSN, RN, The Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland, USA; Lufel Gaid, BSN, RN; Scherry D. Quion, BSN, RN, CNOR; Raniel O. Tagaytayan, BSN, RN
Abstract:
Poster presented at AORN's 58th Annual Congress: Shunts are commonly used to treat hydrocephalus, the swelling of the brain due to excess build up of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), and other related diseases. If left unmonitored, the CSF can build up, leading to an increase in intracranial pressure (ICP) that can cause intracranial hematoma, cerebral edema, and brain tissue herniation. Shunts comes in a variety of forms but all of them consist of a pump or drain connected to a long catheter, the end of which is usually placed in the peritoneal cavity. The incidence of shunt infection has been trending upward in the clinical setting. The majority are due to skin contaminants. As long as the chain of infection is identified, understanding the characteristics of each link provides the health care providers with methods to support vulnerable patients and to prevent the spread of infections. An awareness of this cycle will also provide knowledge of methods of self-protection. Developing measures and techniques while handling shunts has been standardized to eradicate infection. Proper hand washing, wearing masks, a 5-minute hand scrub, and gowning and double-gloving were observed. Preparation of patient's skin using a wide clipper, a 5-minute betadine scrub, and drying before draping was utilized. Use of bibiotic irrigations and shunts not being opened until needed was practiced. Avoidance of following an infected case in the OR, limitation of OR traffic, and avoiding shift change during the 45-minute procedure has been imposed. Surgeons also proved that gentle handling of tissues and careful hemostasis contributed to the success of eradicating shunt infection.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2011
Conference Name:
AORN 58th Annual Congress
Conference Host:
Association of periOperative Registered Nurses
Conference Location:
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA
Description:
AORN 58th Annual Congress, 2011 held March 18, 2011 - March 24, 2011 in Philadelphia Convention Center
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleShunt Infection Eradication: A State of Minden_GB
dc.contributor.authorBangud, Cyrilen_US
dc.contributor.authorGaid, Lufelen_US
dc.contributor.authorQuion, Scherry D.en_US
dc.contributor.authorTagaytayan, Raniel O.en_US
dc.author.detailsCyril C. Bangud, BSN, RN, The Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland, USA; Lufel Gaid, BSN, RN; Scherry D. Quion, BSN, RN, CNOR; Raniel O. Tagaytayan, BSN, RNen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161988-
dc.description.abstractPoster presented at AORN's 58th Annual Congress: Shunts are commonly used to treat hydrocephalus, the swelling of the brain due to excess build up of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), and other related diseases. If left unmonitored, the CSF can build up, leading to an increase in intracranial pressure (ICP) that can cause intracranial hematoma, cerebral edema, and brain tissue herniation. Shunts comes in a variety of forms but all of them consist of a pump or drain connected to a long catheter, the end of which is usually placed in the peritoneal cavity. The incidence of shunt infection has been trending upward in the clinical setting. The majority are due to skin contaminants. As long as the chain of infection is identified, understanding the characteristics of each link provides the health care providers with methods to support vulnerable patients and to prevent the spread of infections. An awareness of this cycle will also provide knowledge of methods of self-protection. Developing measures and techniques while handling shunts has been standardized to eradicate infection. Proper hand washing, wearing masks, a 5-minute hand scrub, and gowning and double-gloving were observed. Preparation of patient's skin using a wide clipper, a 5-minute betadine scrub, and drying before draping was utilized. Use of bibiotic irrigations and shunts not being opened until needed was practiced. Avoidance of following an infected case in the OR, limitation of OR traffic, and avoiding shift change during the 45-minute procedure has been imposed. Surgeons also proved that gentle handling of tissues and careful hemostasis contributed to the success of eradicating shunt infection.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T08:43:54Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T08:43:54Z-
dc.conference.date2011en_US
dc.conference.nameAORN 58th Annual Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostAssociation of periOperative Registered Nursesen_US
dc.conference.locationPhiladelphia, Pennsylvania, USAen_US
dc.descriptionAORN 58th Annual Congress, 2011 held March 18, 2011 - March 24, 2011 in Philadelphia Convention Centeren_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.