2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161996
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Ringing in a New Standard: NO FLASHING!
Author(s):
Benedict, Karen; Cox, Nancy F.; McHale, Janet L.
Author Details:
Karen Benedict, BSN, RN, CNOR, St. Mary Medical Center, Langhorne, Pennsylvania, USA, email: KBenedictx4@msn.com; Nancy F. Cox, BSN, RN, CNOR; Janet L. McHale, RN, CNOR
Abstract:
Poster presented at AORN's 58th Annual Congress: In a desire to meet best practices, the OR team decided to adopt a goal of 0% flash sterilizing. Previous measures had reduced our sterilization rate to 1.2%. Some of the team feared that the goal was unrealistic and unattainable. Over the next several months, after aggressive education measures, the team noted that the flash rate continued to be labile. All components of the flashing process were dissected. A just-in-time autoclave log was developed that revealed the current process problems. The team of leadership, nurses, and SPD staff began meeting twice a week, analyzing the OR schedule, the log, and identifying instrumentation conflicts. The meetings revealed measures to produce scheduling optimization, effective selection of sterilization systems, and necessary instrumentation purchases to realize the goal. This interdisciplinary approach improved communication and fostered collaboration. The team champion made rounds daily educating and guiding the staff on proper instrumentation processing as struggles arose. Even with this uncompromising approach, the team recognized immediately that our success was stalled. A hard rule of NO flashing without flash team approval was adopted. This proved to be a volatile measure that incited our surgeons, as well as nursing colleagues. The rule needed to be NO flash sterilizing without team consultation first, thus providing the OR personnel with the support and assurance they needed. Our current sterilization is down to 0.15%. Our success with best practices has continued to encourage the team with a goal that was thought to initially be daunting.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2011
Conference Name:
AORN 58th Annual Congress
Conference Host:
Association of periOperative Registered Nurses
Conference Location:
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA
Description:
AORN 58th Annual Congress, 2011 held March 18, 2011 - March 24, 2011 in Philadelphia Convention Center
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRinging in a New Standard: NO FLASHING!en_GB
dc.contributor.authorBenedict, Karenen_US
dc.contributor.authorCox, Nancy F.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMcHale, Janet L.en_US
dc.author.detailsKaren Benedict, BSN, RN, CNOR, St. Mary Medical Center, Langhorne, Pennsylvania, USA, email: KBenedictx4@msn.com; Nancy F. Cox, BSN, RN, CNOR; Janet L. McHale, RN, CNORen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161996-
dc.description.abstractPoster presented at AORN's 58th Annual Congress: In a desire to meet best practices, the OR team decided to adopt a goal of 0% flash sterilizing. Previous measures had reduced our sterilization rate to 1.2%. Some of the team feared that the goal was unrealistic and unattainable. Over the next several months, after aggressive education measures, the team noted that the flash rate continued to be labile. All components of the flashing process were dissected. A just-in-time autoclave log was developed that revealed the current process problems. The team of leadership, nurses, and SPD staff began meeting twice a week, analyzing the OR schedule, the log, and identifying instrumentation conflicts. The meetings revealed measures to produce scheduling optimization, effective selection of sterilization systems, and necessary instrumentation purchases to realize the goal. This interdisciplinary approach improved communication and fostered collaboration. The team champion made rounds daily educating and guiding the staff on proper instrumentation processing as struggles arose. Even with this uncompromising approach, the team recognized immediately that our success was stalled. A hard rule of NO flashing without flash team approval was adopted. This proved to be a volatile measure that incited our surgeons, as well as nursing colleagues. The rule needed to be NO flash sterilizing without team consultation first, thus providing the OR personnel with the support and assurance they needed. Our current sterilization is down to 0.15%. Our success with best practices has continued to encourage the team with a goal that was thought to initially be daunting.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T08:44:01Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T08:44:01Z-
dc.conference.date2011en_US
dc.conference.nameAORN 58th Annual Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostAssociation of periOperative Registered Nursesen_US
dc.conference.locationPhiladelphia, Pennsylvania, USAen_US
dc.descriptionAORN 58th Annual Congress, 2011 held March 18, 2011 - March 24, 2011 in Philadelphia Convention Centeren_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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