2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162017
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Hepatic Arterial Infusion Pump: Treating Liver Cancer
Author(s):
Charles, Kizzie
Author Details:
Kizzie Charles, RN, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, USA, email: charlesk@mskcc.org
Abstract:
Poster presented at AORN's 58th Annual Congress: Hepatic arterial infusion (HAI) chemotherapy is an option in the treatment of unresectable liver cancer. Primary liver cancer is rare; however 50% to 60% of colorectal cancer patients develop metastatic disease with the liver being the most common site. Only 20% of patients with colorectal cancer and liver metastases have resectable disease. The HAI pump is a titanium cylinder with two chambers. One chamber is the reservoir that is filled with the chemotherapeutic agent; the other chamber contains a fluorocarbon-powered propellant. The scrub person and the circulating nurse prepare the pump in the operating room. It is heated to 120 degrees F to 140 degrees F, allowing the fluorocarbon liquid to convert into gas. The reservoir is evacuated of air and fluid and then filled with heparinized saline. Once the pump starts to flow, it is cooled to 80 degrees F to 98 degrees F for implantation. HAI chemotherapy treatment is a coordinated effort between oncology and surgical departments, specifically designed for liver cancers. Through an HAI pump, high doses of chemotherapeutic agents are delivered directly to the liver where they are metabolized and extracted, minimizing their systemic effects. The chemotherapeutic agent used most in HAI therapy is floxuridine (5-fluoro-2-deoxyuridine, FUDR). The pumps reservoir is filled with 30 ml of the drug and, approximately, 1.2 ml are released per day. Possible side effects with HAI pump implantation are infection, pump malfunction, catheter blockage, and chemotherapy toxicity. The estimated two-year survival rate is 51% with HAI chemotherapy compared to 35% with systemic chemotherapy.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2011
Conference Name:
AORN 58th Annual Congress
Conference Host:
Association of periOperative Registered Nurses
Conference Location:
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA
Description:
AORN 58th Annual Congress, 2011 held March 18, 2011 - March 24, 2011 in Philadelphia Convention Center
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHepatic Arterial Infusion Pump: Treating Liver Canceren_GB
dc.contributor.authorCharles, Kizzieen_US
dc.author.detailsKizzie Charles, RN, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, USA, email: charlesk@mskcc.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162017-
dc.description.abstractPoster presented at AORN's 58th Annual Congress: Hepatic arterial infusion (HAI) chemotherapy is an option in the treatment of unresectable liver cancer. Primary liver cancer is rare; however 50% to 60% of colorectal cancer patients develop metastatic disease with the liver being the most common site. Only 20% of patients with colorectal cancer and liver metastases have resectable disease. The HAI pump is a titanium cylinder with two chambers. One chamber is the reservoir that is filled with the chemotherapeutic agent; the other chamber contains a fluorocarbon-powered propellant. The scrub person and the circulating nurse prepare the pump in the operating room. It is heated to 120 degrees F to 140 degrees F, allowing the fluorocarbon liquid to convert into gas. The reservoir is evacuated of air and fluid and then filled with heparinized saline. Once the pump starts to flow, it is cooled to 80 degrees F to 98 degrees F for implantation. HAI chemotherapy treatment is a coordinated effort between oncology and surgical departments, specifically designed for liver cancers. Through an HAI pump, high doses of chemotherapeutic agents are delivered directly to the liver where they are metabolized and extracted, minimizing their systemic effects. The chemotherapeutic agent used most in HAI therapy is floxuridine (5-fluoro-2-deoxyuridine, FUDR). The pumps reservoir is filled with 30 ml of the drug and, approximately, 1.2 ml are released per day. Possible side effects with HAI pump implantation are infection, pump malfunction, catheter blockage, and chemotherapy toxicity. The estimated two-year survival rate is 51% with HAI chemotherapy compared to 35% with systemic chemotherapy.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T08:44:21Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T08:44:21Z-
dc.conference.date2011en_US
dc.conference.nameAORN 58th Annual Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostAssociation of periOperative Registered Nursesen_US
dc.conference.locationPhiladelphia, Pennsylvania, USAen_US
dc.descriptionAORN 58th Annual Congress, 2011 held March 18, 2011 - March 24, 2011 in Philadelphia Convention Centeren_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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