2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162035
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Cleansing of Gross Debris Prior to Prepping
Author(s):
Delgado, Jr., Joe; Lam, Alice
Author Details:
Joe C. Delgado, Jr., BSN, RN, The Methodist Hospital, Houston, Texas, USA, email: JCDelgado2@tmhs.org; Alice Lam, BSN, RN
Abstract:
Poster presented at AORN's 58th Annual Congress: A high school football player enters the emergency room with a fractured wrist. A sugar tong splint is placed and he is then told to follow up with an orthopedic surgeon as soon as possible. Never removing the splint, the patient follows up with an orthopedic surgeon and is told he needs surgery. The previous splint is removed and after examination, a new one is placed for protection and comfort. The patient then goes in for surgery with an extremity that has not been cleansed since before the injury. What are the recommended practices for cleansing of gross debris prior to prepping? Patient safety is the number one priority in hospitals; therefore, research on better methods of cleansing the operative site preoperatively is crucial in preventing surgical site infections. Many of the current practices are done based on traditions and recommendations with limited evidence base-research. Physicians at The Methodist Hospital practice different techniques of cleansing gross debris prior to prepping (i.e., alcohol wipe, povidone scrub, or povidone-iodine scrub and paint). Due to the lack of evidence, funding for research is necessary for not only patient safety, but to help hospitals decrease their expenditures on hospital acquired surgical site infections. Therefore, it is crucial to conduct research to understand the complex structure of infections and surgery and to help better comprehend the needs for proper skin cleansing prior to a surgical operation.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2011
Conference Name:
AORN 58th Annual Congress
Conference Host:
Association of periOperative Registered Nurses
Conference Location:
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA
Description:
AORN 58th Annual Congress, 2011 held March 18, 2011 - March 24, 2011 in Philadelphia Convention Center
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCleansing of Gross Debris Prior to Preppingen_GB
dc.contributor.authorDelgado, Jr., Joeen_US
dc.contributor.authorLam, Aliceen_US
dc.author.detailsJoe C. Delgado, Jr., BSN, RN, The Methodist Hospital, Houston, Texas, USA, email: JCDelgado2@tmhs.org; Alice Lam, BSN, RNen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162035-
dc.description.abstractPoster presented at AORN's 58th Annual Congress: A high school football player enters the emergency room with a fractured wrist. A sugar tong splint is placed and he is then told to follow up with an orthopedic surgeon as soon as possible. Never removing the splint, the patient follows up with an orthopedic surgeon and is told he needs surgery. The previous splint is removed and after examination, a new one is placed for protection and comfort. The patient then goes in for surgery with an extremity that has not been cleansed since before the injury. What are the recommended practices for cleansing of gross debris prior to prepping? Patient safety is the number one priority in hospitals; therefore, research on better methods of cleansing the operative site preoperatively is crucial in preventing surgical site infections. Many of the current practices are done based on traditions and recommendations with limited evidence base-research. Physicians at The Methodist Hospital practice different techniques of cleansing gross debris prior to prepping (i.e., alcohol wipe, povidone scrub, or povidone-iodine scrub and paint). Due to the lack of evidence, funding for research is necessary for not only patient safety, but to help hospitals decrease their expenditures on hospital acquired surgical site infections. Therefore, it is crucial to conduct research to understand the complex structure of infections and surgery and to help better comprehend the needs for proper skin cleansing prior to a surgical operation.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T08:44:38Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T08:44:38Z-
dc.conference.date2011en_US
dc.conference.nameAORN 58th Annual Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostAssociation of periOperative Registered Nursesen_US
dc.conference.locationPhiladelphia, Pennsylvania, USAen_US
dc.descriptionAORN 58th Annual Congress, 2011 held March 18, 2011 - March 24, 2011 in Philadelphia Convention Centeren_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.