2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162044
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Wand Can Safely Work Magic for YOU!
Author(s):
Doshi, Ann; Fidellaga, Arlin
Author Details:
Ann C. Doshi, RN, CNOR, Morristown Memorial Hospital, Morristown, New Jersey, USA, email: ann.doshi@atlantichealth.org; Arlin Fidellaga, BSN, RN, CNOR
Abstract:
Poster presented at AORN's 58th Annual Congress: This is a story that has happened to us as an operating room (OR) team: losing a sponge. We researched and assessed our options, then planned training for a wand device. Implementation followed after educational presentations, a tutorial, and hands-on for the OR team players. After using it, we found our outcomes with this device are improved. It can be frightening when a patient has a sponge tucked away to control a bleed or lost on the field and unaccounted for during surgery. A sponge could unintentionally drop and land on the floor out of sight. Do these examples sound familiar? This event is not unique because many nurses will tell you when a sponge is missing they look through the trash, the linen, and all around the OR room to try and find it. These are tense moments when you start to question where it could be? To be able to wand the patient as a preventative safety measure or when a sponge cannot be found, is invaluable. If you have ever encountered a near miss occurrence similar to our story, you would be most grateful to have this safety device in your OR room.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2011
Conference Name:
AORN 58th Annual Congress
Conference Host:
Association of periOperative Registered Nurses
Conference Location:
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA
Description:
AORN 58th Annual Congress, 2011 held March 18, 2011 - March 24, 2011 in Philadelphia Convention Center
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Wand Can Safely Work Magic for YOU!en_GB
dc.contributor.authorDoshi, Annen_US
dc.contributor.authorFidellaga, Arlinen_US
dc.author.detailsAnn C. Doshi, RN, CNOR, Morristown Memorial Hospital, Morristown, New Jersey, USA, email: ann.doshi@atlantichealth.org; Arlin Fidellaga, BSN, RN, CNORen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162044-
dc.description.abstractPoster presented at AORN's 58th Annual Congress: This is a story that has happened to us as an operating room (OR) team: losing a sponge. We researched and assessed our options, then planned training for a wand device. Implementation followed after educational presentations, a tutorial, and hands-on for the OR team players. After using it, we found our outcomes with this device are improved. It can be frightening when a patient has a sponge tucked away to control a bleed or lost on the field and unaccounted for during surgery. A sponge could unintentionally drop and land on the floor out of sight. Do these examples sound familiar? This event is not unique because many nurses will tell you when a sponge is missing they look through the trash, the linen, and all around the OR room to try and find it. These are tense moments when you start to question where it could be? To be able to wand the patient as a preventative safety measure or when a sponge cannot be found, is invaluable. If you have ever encountered a near miss occurrence similar to our story, you would be most grateful to have this safety device in your OR room.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T08:44:46Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T08:44:46Z-
dc.conference.date2011en_US
dc.conference.nameAORN 58th Annual Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostAssociation of periOperative Registered Nursesen_US
dc.conference.locationPhiladelphia, Pennsylvania, USAen_US
dc.descriptionAORN 58th Annual Congress, 2011 held March 18, 2011 - March 24, 2011 in Philadelphia Convention Centeren_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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