2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162053
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Body Jewelry and Surgical Injury
Author(s):
Fahey, Diane; Jackson, Denice E.; Johnson, Mark K.; Lado, Kathleen; Papa, Andrea C.; Tuman, Margaret
Author Details:
Diane M. Fahey, BSN, BA, RN, CNOR, Summit Surgical Center, LLC, Voorhees, New Jersey, USA, email: dfaheyrn@comcast.net; Denice E. Jackson, BS, RN, CNOR; Mark K. Johnson, RN, CNOR; Kathleen Lado, BSN, RN, CNOR; Andrea C. Papa, RN, CNOR; Margaret Tuman, RN
Abstract:
Poster presented at AORN's 58th Annual Congress: In the US, it is estimated that 23 million in-patient and 27 million out-patient surgeries are performed each year. The perioperative professionals caring for patients with body jewelry/piercings are faced with the dilemma of whether to remove or not remove patient jewelry prior to surgical procedures. Patients wearing jewelry can be injured from burns, aspiration, pressure wounds, infection, or laceration and jewelry may be damaged, lost, or interfere with treatments or imaging studies. In a recent survey of college students, 60% of females and 42% of males have some type of body jewelry. Unfortunately, despite a piercing being in place for years, the piercing tract can shrink or close in minutes (according to the Association of Professional Piercers). This fact, combined with patient dissatisfaction, professional liability, and difficulty in removing and reinserting body jewelry, adds to the controversy of whether to preoperatively remove or not remove these items. An extensive review of the literature reveals controversy and conflicting information from physicians, anesthesia, and nursing. All disciplines agree that policies and procedures should exist, however, no consensus of what they should be can be agreed upon. Options for the practitioner include preoperative removal of jewelry, use of sleepers or other devices to maintain the integrity of the piercing tract following removal of the jewelry, or proceeding with the surgical procedure with jewelry in place after careful consideration of safety issues from the perspective of patient, anesthesia provider, surgeon, and perioperative nurses.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2011
Conference Name:
AORN 58th Annual Congress
Conference Host:
Association of periOperative Registered Nurses
Conference Location:
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA
Description:
AORN 58th Annual Congress, 2011 held March 18, 2011 - March 24, 2011 in Philadelphia Convention Center
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleBody Jewelry and Surgical Injuryen_GB
dc.contributor.authorFahey, Dianeen_US
dc.contributor.authorJackson, Denice E.en_US
dc.contributor.authorJohnson, Mark K.en_US
dc.contributor.authorLado, Kathleenen_US
dc.contributor.authorPapa, Andrea C.en_US
dc.contributor.authorTuman, Margareten_US
dc.author.detailsDiane M. Fahey, BSN, BA, RN, CNOR, Summit Surgical Center, LLC, Voorhees, New Jersey, USA, email: dfaheyrn@comcast.net; Denice E. Jackson, BS, RN, CNOR; Mark K. Johnson, RN, CNOR; Kathleen Lado, BSN, RN, CNOR; Andrea C. Papa, RN, CNOR; Margaret Tuman, RNen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162053-
dc.description.abstractPoster presented at AORN's 58th Annual Congress: In the US, it is estimated that 23 million in-patient and 27 million out-patient surgeries are performed each year. The perioperative professionals caring for patients with body jewelry/piercings are faced with the dilemma of whether to remove or not remove patient jewelry prior to surgical procedures. Patients wearing jewelry can be injured from burns, aspiration, pressure wounds, infection, or laceration and jewelry may be damaged, lost, or interfere with treatments or imaging studies. In a recent survey of college students, 60% of females and 42% of males have some type of body jewelry. Unfortunately, despite a piercing being in place for years, the piercing tract can shrink or close in minutes (according to the Association of Professional Piercers). This fact, combined with patient dissatisfaction, professional liability, and difficulty in removing and reinserting body jewelry, adds to the controversy of whether to preoperatively remove or not remove these items. An extensive review of the literature reveals controversy and conflicting information from physicians, anesthesia, and nursing. All disciplines agree that policies and procedures should exist, however, no consensus of what they should be can be agreed upon. Options for the practitioner include preoperative removal of jewelry, use of sleepers or other devices to maintain the integrity of the piercing tract following removal of the jewelry, or proceeding with the surgical procedure with jewelry in place after careful consideration of safety issues from the perspective of patient, anesthesia provider, surgeon, and perioperative nurses.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T08:44:54Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T08:44:54Z-
dc.conference.date2011en_US
dc.conference.nameAORN 58th Annual Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostAssociation of periOperative Registered Nursesen_US
dc.conference.locationPhiladelphia, Pennsylvania, USAen_US
dc.descriptionAORN 58th Annual Congress, 2011 held March 18, 2011 - March 24, 2011 in Philadelphia Convention Centeren_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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