2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162085
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Perioperative Nurse Self-Efficacy and Disruptive Behavior
Author(s):
Saxton, Rebecca
Author Details:
Rebecca Saxton, PhD, RN, CNOR, Research College of Nursing, Kansas City, Missouri, USA, email: rebecca.saxton@researchcollege.edu
Abstract:
Poster presented at AORN's 58th Annual Congress: Purpose of Project: The aim of this study was to determine if an educational communication skills intervention would increase perioperative nurse self-efficacy to address disruptive physician behavior, and increased self-efficacy was associated with improved ability to address disruptive physician behavior. Methodology: A one-group pre-test/post-test study design was used with a convenience sample. The intervention was based on Humanistic Nursing Communication Theory and the self-efficacy component of Social Cognitive Theory. Study participants (n=17), who were recruited from a Midwestern chapter of the Association of PeriOperative Registered Nurses (AORN), participated in a two-day communication skills program based on the Crucial Conversations Training Healthcare Track. The Self-Efficacy to Address Disruptive Behavior Scale, a 10 item Likert-type scaled instrument, was used to collect study data before the intervention, immediately after the intervention, and four weeks following the intervention. Results: Using paired t-test analysis, there was a significant increase in total mean self-efficacy scores from pre-test to post-test #1 (t(16) = -4.411, p<0.05, r=.74) and from pre-test to post-test #2 (t(16) = -3.377, p<0.05, r=.64). Participants were able to address disruptive physician behavior 71% of the time four weeks after the intervention. Limitations included the use of a one-group pre-test/post-test study design, and a small convenience sample. Perioperative Nursing Implications: Disruptive physician behavior is prevalent in the perioperative setting and poses a serious threat to patient safety. This educational communication skills intervention shows promise as one possible evidence-based intervention strategy to increase perioperative nurse self-efficacy and ability to address disruptive physician behavior.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2011
Conference Name:
AORN 58th Annual Congress
Conference Host:
Association of periOperative Registered Nurses
Conference Location:
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA
Description:
AORN 58th Annual Congress, 2011 held March 18, 2011 - March 24, 2011 in Philadelphia Convention Center
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePerioperative Nurse Self-Efficacy and Disruptive Behavioren_GB
dc.contributor.authorSaxton, Rebeccaen_US
dc.author.detailsRebecca Saxton, PhD, RN, CNOR, Research College of Nursing, Kansas City, Missouri, USA, email: rebecca.saxton@researchcollege.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162085-
dc.description.abstractPoster presented at AORN's 58th Annual Congress: Purpose of Project: The aim of this study was to determine if an educational communication skills intervention would increase perioperative nurse self-efficacy to address disruptive physician behavior, and increased self-efficacy was associated with improved ability to address disruptive physician behavior. Methodology: A one-group pre-test/post-test study design was used with a convenience sample. The intervention was based on Humanistic Nursing Communication Theory and the self-efficacy component of Social Cognitive Theory. Study participants (n=17), who were recruited from a Midwestern chapter of the Association of PeriOperative Registered Nurses (AORN), participated in a two-day communication skills program based on the Crucial Conversations Training Healthcare Track. The Self-Efficacy to Address Disruptive Behavior Scale, a 10 item Likert-type scaled instrument, was used to collect study data before the intervention, immediately after the intervention, and four weeks following the intervention. Results: Using paired t-test analysis, there was a significant increase in total mean self-efficacy scores from pre-test to post-test #1 (t(16) = -4.411, p&lt;0.05, r=.74) and from pre-test to post-test #2 (t(16) = -3.377, p&lt;0.05, r=.64). Participants were able to address disruptive physician behavior 71% of the time four weeks after the intervention. Limitations included the use of a one-group pre-test/post-test study design, and a small convenience sample. Perioperative Nursing Implications: Disruptive physician behavior is prevalent in the perioperative setting and poses a serious threat to patient safety. This educational communication skills intervention shows promise as one possible evidence-based intervention strategy to increase perioperative nurse self-efficacy and ability to address disruptive physician behavior.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T08:45:24Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T08:45:24Z-
dc.conference.date2011en_US
dc.conference.nameAORN 58th Annual Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostAssociation of periOperative Registered Nursesen_US
dc.conference.locationPhiladelphia, Pennsylvania, USAen_US
dc.descriptionAORN 58th Annual Congress, 2011 held March 18, 2011 - March 24, 2011 in Philadelphia Convention Centeren_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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