2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162100
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The CVOR Circulating Nurse's Role In Incident Recovery
Author(s):
Henry, Linda; Dellinger, Mary B.; Emmerson, Brett; Kroetch, Mary A.; Schatz, Edward J.; Seifert, Patricia "Trish" C.; Yang, Y. Anthony; Yonish, Kersten A.
Author Details:
Linda Henry, PhD, Inova Heart and Vascular Institute, Falls Church, Virginia, USA, email: linda.henry@inova.org; Mary B. Dellinger, BSN, RN, ANP, CNOR, CRNFA; Brett Emmerson, BSN, RN, CNOR; Mary A. Kroetch, RN, CNOR, CRNFA; Edward J. Schatz, BSN, RN, CNOR, CRNFA; Patricia ``Trish`` C. Seifert, MSN, RN, CRNFA, CNOR, FAAN; Y. Anthony Yang, PhD, JD; and Kersten A. Yonish, BSN, RN, CNOR, CRNFA
Abstract:
Poster Presentation: Purpose: Nursing surveillance, an essential component in perioperative practice, includes the detection and recovery of incidents. However, incident recovery is considered routine during nursing care and may go under-recognized. Our study assessed the types of incidents that were detected and recovered by the circulating nurse in a perioperative setting. Methods: This observational study used the Perioperative Nursing Data Set (PNDS) interventions from the Safety Domain for data collection. Observations occurred during the surgical care of CABG, CABG/valve, or valve patients. Each incident was classified by cognitive stage (planning, execution, monitoring) of the task; categorized into a skill-, rules-, or knowledge-based incident, and delineated into an individual, system (CVOR) or organizational failure (hospital). Results: From June 2010 to September 2010, 18 surgical procedures were observed. There was an average of 8.39 incidents per case; however, 75% of all incidents were intercepted and the other 25% were either mitigated or ameliorated. The majority (36%) involved breaks in aseptic technique or surgical prep. Ninety-four percent were considered potentially significant errors, 80% were definitely preventable, 66% occurred during execution of the task, 86% were skill-based, and 95% occurred on the individual level. There were no adverse patient outcomes as defined by the Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Implications: This is one of the first studies looking at the circulators role in error prevention in the operating room and demonstrated their vital role in maintaining the safety of the patient. This study reinforces the necessity of vigilance in the operating room, especially in regards to aseptic technique and surgical prepping.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2011
Conference Name:
AORN 58th Annual Congress
Conference Host:
Association of periOperative Registered Nurses
Conference Location:
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA
Description:
AORN 58th Annual Congress, 2011 held March 18, 2011 - March 24, 2011 in Philadelphia Convention Center
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe CVOR Circulating Nurse's Role In Incident Recoveryen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHenry, Lindaen_US
dc.contributor.authorDellinger, Mary B.en_US
dc.contributor.authorEmmerson, Bretten_US
dc.contributor.authorKroetch, Mary A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSchatz, Edward J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSeifert, Patricia "Trish" C.en_US
dc.contributor.authorYang, Y. Anthonyen_US
dc.contributor.authorYonish, Kersten A.en_US
dc.author.detailsLinda Henry, PhD, Inova Heart and Vascular Institute, Falls Church, Virginia, USA, email: linda.henry@inova.org; Mary B. Dellinger, BSN, RN, ANP, CNOR, CRNFA; Brett Emmerson, BSN, RN, CNOR; Mary A. Kroetch, RN, CNOR, CRNFA; Edward J. Schatz, BSN, RN, CNOR, CRNFA; Patricia ``Trish`` C. Seifert, MSN, RN, CRNFA, CNOR, FAAN; Y. Anthony Yang, PhD, JD; and Kersten A. Yonish, BSN, RN, CNOR, CRNFAen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162100-
dc.description.abstractPoster Presentation: Purpose: Nursing surveillance, an essential component in perioperative practice, includes the detection and recovery of incidents. However, incident recovery is considered routine during nursing care and may go under-recognized. Our study assessed the types of incidents that were detected and recovered by the circulating nurse in a perioperative setting. Methods: This observational study used the Perioperative Nursing Data Set (PNDS) interventions from the Safety Domain for data collection. Observations occurred during the surgical care of CABG, CABG/valve, or valve patients. Each incident was classified by cognitive stage (planning, execution, monitoring) of the task; categorized into a skill-, rules-, or knowledge-based incident, and delineated into an individual, system (CVOR) or organizational failure (hospital). Results: From June 2010 to September 2010, 18 surgical procedures were observed. There was an average of 8.39 incidents per case; however, 75% of all incidents were intercepted and the other 25% were either mitigated or ameliorated. The majority (36%) involved breaks in aseptic technique or surgical prep. Ninety-four percent were considered potentially significant errors, 80% were definitely preventable, 66% occurred during execution of the task, 86% were skill-based, and 95% occurred on the individual level. There were no adverse patient outcomes as defined by the Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Implications: This is one of the first studies looking at the circulators role in error prevention in the operating room and demonstrated their vital role in maintaining the safety of the patient. This study reinforces the necessity of vigilance in the operating room, especially in regards to aseptic technique and surgical prepping.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T08:45:39Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T08:45:39Z-
dc.conference.date2011en_US
dc.conference.nameAORN 58th Annual Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostAssociation of periOperative Registered Nursesen_US
dc.conference.locationPhiladelphia, Pennsylvania, USAen_US
dc.descriptionAORN 58th Annual Congress, 2011 held March 18, 2011 - March 24, 2011 in Philadelphia Convention Centeren_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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