2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162121
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Older Person's Experience of Managing Medications: The Myth of Compliance
Author(s):
Glassman, Kimberly S.
Author Details:
Kimberly S. Glassman, PhD(c), RN, NYU Hospitals Center, New York, New York, USA, email: kim.glassman@nyumc.org
Abstract:
Purpose: The purpose of this phenomenological study was to explore the meaning of compliance with prescription medications to older adults with heart failure (HF). Background: Several decades of research on compliance with medications has not altered the current state of knowledge: people's self-care behaviors are labeled as "noncompliant" by their health care providers. While theories, behaviors and interventions used to explain noncompliance have expanded, the research has yet to provide a solution to the problem. Methods (Design, Participants, Setting, Data Collection, Analytic approach): Five older adults were recruited through physician's private practices associated with an urban academic medical center in the northeast. All participants were community-dwelling, and were taking an average of ten prescription medications for their HF. Each participated in at least two open-ended interviews to describe their experience of living with heart failure and managing their medications, and was contacted by telephone for additional information. Interviews were transcribed from taped recordings, and analyzed with the method ascribed by Giorgi. The descriptive phenomenology of Maurice Merleau-Ponty provided the philosophical framework for analysis. Results: Findings included central themes of: self-management of HF; relationships with others; and aging with chronic illness. Compliance as conceptualized by health care providers had little meaning for the participants in this study who self-managed their medications and other aspects of their daily life. Participants wanted more information about the side effects of their medications and they wanted their providers to more directly address their experiences with the physical effects of medication. Conclusions and Implications: The concept of compliance is inadequate for understanding how people with chronic illness manage their condition and their associated treatments. Listening to what our patients tell us about their experience, anticipating some degree of medication mismanagement and openly discussing specific and individualized strategies to help patients take their medications as prescribed may yield better outcomes for patients. Further exploration of the concept of self-management is warranted.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
19th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Providence, Rhode Island, USA
Description:
Conference theme: Building Communities of Scholarship and Research, held April 12-14, 2007 at The Westin Providence.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleOlder Person's Experience of Managing Medications: The Myth of Complianceen_GB
dc.contributor.authorGlassman, Kimberly S.en_US
dc.author.detailsKimberly S. Glassman, PhD(c), RN, NYU Hospitals Center, New York, New York, USA, email: kim.glassman@nyumc.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162121-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The purpose of this phenomenological study was to explore the meaning of compliance with prescription medications to older adults with heart failure (HF). Background: Several decades of research on compliance with medications has not altered the current state of knowledge: people's self-care behaviors are labeled as "noncompliant" by their health care providers. While theories, behaviors and interventions used to explain noncompliance have expanded, the research has yet to provide a solution to the problem. Methods (Design, Participants, Setting, Data Collection, Analytic approach): Five older adults were recruited through physician's private practices associated with an urban academic medical center in the northeast. All participants were community-dwelling, and were taking an average of ten prescription medications for their HF. Each participated in at least two open-ended interviews to describe their experience of living with heart failure and managing their medications, and was contacted by telephone for additional information. Interviews were transcribed from taped recordings, and analyzed with the method ascribed by Giorgi. The descriptive phenomenology of Maurice Merleau-Ponty provided the philosophical framework for analysis. Results: Findings included central themes of: self-management of HF; relationships with others; and aging with chronic illness. Compliance as conceptualized by health care providers had little meaning for the participants in this study who self-managed their medications and other aspects of their daily life. Participants wanted more information about the side effects of their medications and they wanted their providers to more directly address their experiences with the physical effects of medication. Conclusions and Implications: The concept of compliance is inadequate for understanding how people with chronic illness manage their condition and their associated treatments. Listening to what our patients tell us about their experience, anticipating some degree of medication mismanagement and openly discussing specific and individualized strategies to help patients take their medications as prescribed may yield better outcomes for patients. Further exploration of the concept of self-management is warranted.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:01:14Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:01:14Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name19th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationProvidence, Rhode Island, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: Building Communities of Scholarship and Research, held April 12-14, 2007 at The Westin Providence.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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